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3. Terminal types


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3.1 terminal

Gnuplot supports a large number of output formats. These are selected by choosing an appropriate terminal type, possibly with additional modifying options. See `set terminal`.

This document may describe terminal types that are not available to you because they were not configured or installed on your system. To see a list of terminals available on a particular gnuplot installation, type 'set terminal' with no modifiers. @c <3 - all terminal stuff is pulled from the .trm files


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3.1.0.1 aed767

The `aed512` and `aed767` terminal drivers support AED graphics terminals. The two drivers differ only in their horizontal ranges, which are 512 and 768 pixels, respectively. Their vertical range is 575 pixels. There are no options for these drivers."


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3.1.0.2 aifm

NOTE: this terminal driver is outdated. Since Adobe Illustrator understands PostScript level 1 directly, you should use `set terminal post level1` instead.

Several options may be set in `aifm`--the Adobe Illustrator 3.0+ driver.

Syntax:

 
      set terminal aifm {<color>} {"<fontname>"} {<fontsize>}

<color> is either `color` or `monochrome`; "<fontname>" is the name of a valid PostScript font; <fontsize> is the size of the font in PostScript points, before scaling by the size command. Selecting `default` sets all options to their default values: `monochrome`, "Times-Roman", and 14pt.

Since AI does not really support multiple pages, multiple graphs will be drawn directly on top of one another. However, each graph will be grouped individually, making it easy to separate them inside AI (just pick them up and move them).

Examples:

 
      set term aifm
      set term aifm 22
      set size 0.7,1.4; set term aifm color "Times-Roman" 14"


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3.1.0.3 amiga

The `amiga` terminal, for Commodore Amiga computers, allows the user to plot either to a screen (default), or, if Kickstart 3.0 or higher is installed, to a window on the current public screen. The font and its size can also be selected.

Syntax:

 
      set terminal amiga {screen | window} {"<fontname>"} {<fontsize>}

The default font is 8-point "topaz".

The screen option uses a virtual screen, so it is possible that the graph will be larger than the screen."


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3.1.0.4 apollo

The `apollo` terminal driver supports the Apollo Graphics Primitive Resource with rescaling after window resizing. It has no options.

If a fixed-size window is desired, the `gpr` terminal may be used instead."


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3.1.0.5 aqua

This terminal relies on AquaTerm.app for display on Mac OS X.

Syntax:

 
      set terminal aqua {<n>} {title "<wintitle>"} {size <x> <y>}
                        {font "<fontname>{,<fontsize>}"}
                        {{no}enhanced} {solid|dashed} {dl <dashlength>}}

where <n> is the number of the window to draw in (default is 0), <wintitle> is the name shown in the title bar (default "Figure <n>"), <x> <y> is the size of the plot (default is 846x594 pt = 11.75x8.25 in).

Use <fontname> to specify the font to use (default is "Times-Roman"), and <fontsize> to specify the font size (default is 14.0 pt). The old syntax {fname "<fontname>"} {fsize <fontsize>} is still supported.

The aqua terminal supports enhanced text mode (see `enhanced`), except for overprint. Font support is limited to the fonts available on the system. Character encoding can be selected by encoding and currently supports iso_latin_1, iso_latin_2, cp1250, and default which equals UTF8.

Lines can be drawn either solid or dashed, (default is solid) and the dash spacing can be modified by <dashlength> which is a multiplier > 0.


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3.1.0.6 atari ST (via AES)

The `atari` terminal has options to set the character size and the screen colors.

Syntax:

 
      set terminal atari {<fontsize>} {<col0> <col1> ... <col15>}

The character size must appear if any colors are to be specified. Each of the (up to 16) colors is given as a three-digit hex number, where the digits represent RED, GREEN and BLUE (in that order). The range of 0-15 is scaled to whatever color range the screen actually has. On a normal ST screen, odd and even intensities are the same.

Examples:

 
      set terminal atari 4    # use small (6x6) font
      set terminal atari 6 0  # set monochrome screen to white on black
      set terminal atari 13 0 fff f00 f0 f ff f0f
                 # set first seven colors to black, white, red, green,
                 # blue, cyan, and purple and use large font (8x16).

Additionally, if an environment variable GNUCOLORS exists, its contents are interpreted as an options string, but an explicit terminal option takes precedence."


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3.1.0.7 atari ST (via VDI)

The `vdi` terminal is the same as the `atari` terminal, except that it sends output to the screen via the VDI and not into AES-Windows.

The `vdi` terminal has options to set the character size and the screen colors.

Syntax:

 
      set terminal vdi {<fontsize>} {<col0> <col1> ... <col15>}

The character size must appear if any colors are to be specified. Each of the (up to 16) colors is given as a three-digit hex number, where the digits represent RED, GREEN and BLUE (in that order). The range of 0-15 is scaled to whatever color range the screen actually has. On a normal ST screen, odd and even intensities are the same.

Examples:

 
      set terminal vdi 4    # use small (6x6) font
      set terminal vdi 6 0  # set monochrome screen to white on black
      set terminal vdi 13 0 fff f00 f0 f ff f0f
                 # set first seven colors to black, white, red, green,
                 # blue, cyan, and purple and use large font (8x16).

Additionally, if an environment variable GNUCOLORS exists, its contents are interpreted as an options string, but an explicit terminal option takes precedence."


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3.1.0.8 be

`gnuplot` provides the `be` terminal type for use with X servers. This terminal type is set automatically at startup if the `DISPLAY` environment variable is set, if the `TERM` environment variable is set to `xterm`, or if the `-display` command line option is used.

Syntax:

 
          set terminal be {reset} {<n>}

Multiple plot windows are supported: `set terminal be <n>` directs the output to plot window number n. If n>0, the terminal number will be appended to the window title and the icon will be labeled `gplt <n>`. The active window may distinguished by a change in cursor (from default to crosshair.)

Plot windows remain open even when the `gnuplot` driver is changed to a different device. A plot window can be closed by pressing the letter q while that window has input focus, or by choosing `close` from a window manager menu. All plot windows can be closed by specifying reset, which actually terminates the subprocess which maintains the windows (unless `-persist` was specified).

Plot windows will automatically be closed at the end of the session unless the `-persist` option was given.

The size or aspect ratio of a plot may be changed by resizing the `gnuplot` window.

Linewidths and pointsizes may be changed from within `gnuplot` with `set linestyle`.

For terminal type `be`, `gnuplot` accepts (when initialized) the standard X Toolkit options and resources such as geometry, font, and name from the command line arguments or a configuration file. See the X(1) man page (or its equivalent) for a description of such options.

A number of other `gnuplot` options are available for the `be` terminal. These may be specified either as command-line options when `gnuplot` is invoked or as resources in the configuration file ".Xdefaults". They are set upon initialization and cannot be altered during a `gnuplot` session.

-- COMMAND-LINE_OPTIONS --

In addition to the X Toolkit options, the following options may be specified on the command line when starting `gnuplot` or as resources in your ".Xdefaults" file:

 
 `-mono`        forces monochrome rendering on color displays.
 `-gray`        requests grayscale rendering on grayscale or color displays.
                        (Grayscale displays receive monochrome rendering by default.)
 `-clear`   requests that the window be cleared momentarily before a
                        new plot is displayed.
 `-raise`   raises plot window after each plot
 `-noraise` does not raise plot window after each plot
 `-persist` plots windows survive after main gnuplot program exits

The options are shown above in their command-line syntax. When entered as resources in ".Xdefaults", they require a different syntax.

Example:

 
          gnuplot*gray: on

`gnuplot` also provides a command line option (`-pointsize <v>`) and a resource, `gnuplot*pointsize: <v>`, to control the size of points plotted with the `points` plotting style. The value `v` is a real number (greater than 0 and less than or equal to ten) used as a scaling factor for point sizes. For example, `-pointsize 2` uses points twice the default size, and `-pointsize 0.5` uses points half the normal size.

-- MONOCHROME_OPTIONS --

For monochrome displays, `gnuplot` does not honor foreground or background colors. The default is black-on-white. `-rv` or `gnuplot*reverseVideo: on` requests white-on-black.

-- COLOR_RESOURCES --

For color displays, `gnuplot` honors the following resources (shown here with their default values) or the greyscale resources. The values may be color names as listed in the BE rgb.txt file on your system, hexadecimal RGB color specifications (see BE documentation), or a color name followed by a comma and an `intensity` value from 0 to 1. For example, `blue, 0.5` means a half intensity blue.

 
 gnuplot*background:  white
 gnuplot*textColor:   black
 gnuplot*borderColor: black
 gnuplot*axisColor:   black
 gnuplot*line1Color:  red
 gnuplot*line2Color:  green
 gnuplot*line3Color:  blue
 gnuplot*line4Color:  magenta
 gnuplot*line5Color:  cyan
 gnuplot*line6Color:  sienna
 gnuplot*line7Color:  orange
 gnuplot*line8Color:  coral

The command-line syntax for these is, for example,

Example:

 
          gnuplot -background coral

-- GRAYSCALE_RESOURCES --

When `-gray` is selected, `gnuplot` honors the following resources for grayscale or color displays (shown here with their default values). Note that the default background is black.

 
 gnuplot*background: black
 gnuplot*textGray:   white
 gnuplot*borderGray: gray50
 gnuplot*axisGray:   gray50
 gnuplot*line1Gray:  gray100
 gnuplot*line2Gray:  gray60
 gnuplot*line3Gray:  gray80
 gnuplot*line4Gray:  gray40
 gnuplot*line5Gray:  gray90
 gnuplot*line6Gray:  gray50
 gnuplot*line7Gray:  gray70
 gnuplot*line8Gray:  gray30

-- LINE_RESOURCES --

`gnuplot` honors the following resources for setting the width (in pixels) of plot lines (shown here with their default values.) 0 or 1 means a minimal width line of 1 pixel width. A value of 2 or 3 may improve the appearance of some plots.

 
 gnuplot*borderWidth: 2
 gnuplot*axisWidth:   0
 gnuplot*line1Width:  0
 gnuplot*line2Width:  0
 gnuplot*line3Width:  0
 gnuplot*line4Width:  0
 gnuplot*line5Width:  0
 gnuplot*line6Width:  0
 gnuplot*line7Width:  0
 gnuplot*line8Width:  0

`gnuplot` honors the following resources for setting the dash style used for plotting lines. 0 means a solid line. A two-digit number `jk` (`j` and `k` are >= 1 and <= 9) means a dashed line with a repeated pattern of `j` pixels on followed by `k` pixels off. For example, '16' is a "dotted" line with one pixel on followed by six pixels off. More elaborate on/off patterns can be specified with a four-digit value. For example, '4441' is four on, four off, four on, one off. The default values shown below are for monochrome displays or monochrome rendering on color or grayscale displays. For color displays, the default for each is 0 (solid line) except for `axisDashes` which defaults to a '16' dotted line.

 
 gnuplot*borderDashes:   0
 gnuplot*axisDashes:        16
 gnuplot*line1Dashes:        0
 gnuplot*line2Dashes:   42
 gnuplot*line3Dashes:   13
 gnuplot*line4Dashes:   44
 gnuplot*line5Dashes:   15
 gnuplot*line6Dashes: 4441
 gnuplot*line7Dashes:   42
 gnuplot*line8Dashes:   13


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3.1.0.9 cgi

The `cgi` and `hcgi` terminal drivers support SCO CGI drivers. `hcgi` is for printers; the environment variable CGIPRNT must be set. `cgi` may be used for either a display or hardcopy; if the environment variable CGIDISP is set, then that display is used. Otherwise CGIPRNT is used.

These terminals have no options."


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3.1.0.10 cgm

The `cgm` terminal generates a Computer Graphics Metafile, Version 1. This file format is a subset of the ANSI X3.122-1986 standard entitled "Computer Graphics - Metafile for the Storage and Transfer of Picture Description Information". Several options may be set in `cgm`.

Syntax:

 
      set terminal cgm {<mode>} {<color>} {<rotation>} {solid | dashed}
                       {width <plot_width>} {linewidth <line_width>}
                       {"<font>"} {<fontsize>}
                       {<color0> <color1> <color2> ...}

where <mode> is `landscape`, `portrait`, or `default`; <color> is either `color` or `monochrome`; <rotation> is either `rotate` or `norotate`; `solid` draws all curves with solid lines, overriding any dashed patterns; <plot_width> is the assumed width of the plot in points; <line_width> is the line width in points (default 1); <font> is the name of a font; and <fontsize> is the size of the font in points (default 12).

By default, `cgm` uses rotated text for the Y axis label.

The first six options can be in any order. Selecting `default` sets all options to their default values.

Each color must be of the form 'xrrggbb', where x is the literal character 'x' and 'rrggbb' are the red, green and blue components in hex. For example, 'x00ff00' is green. The background color is set first, then the plotting colors.

Examples:

 
      set terminal cgm landscape color rotate dashed width 432 \\
                     linewidth 1  'Helvetica Bold' 12       # defaults
      set terminal cgm linewidth 2  14  # wider lines & larger font
      set terminal cgm portrait "Times Italic" 12
      set terminal cgm color solid      # no pesky dashes!

-- FONT --

The first part of a Computer Graphics Metafile, the metafile description, includes a font table. In the picture body, a font is designated by an index into this table. By default, this terminal generates a table with the following 35 fonts, plus six more with `italic` replaced by `oblique`, or vice-versa (since at least the Microsoft Office and Corel Draw CGM import filters treat `italic` and `oblique` as equivalent):

 
      Helvetica
      Helvetica Bold
      Helvetica Oblique
      Helvetica Bold Oblique
      Times Roman
      Times Bold
      Times Italic
      Times Bold Italic
      Courier
      Courier Bold
      Courier Oblique
      Courier Bold Oblique
      Symbol
      Hershey/Cartographic_Roman
      Hershey/Cartographic_Greek
      Hershey/Simplex_Roman
      Hershey/Simplex_Greek
      Hershey/Simplex_Script
      Hershey/Complex_Roman
      Hershey/Complex_Greek
      Hershey/Complex_Script
      Hershey/Complex_Italic
      Hershey/Complex_Cyrillic
      Hershey/Duplex_Roman
      Hershey/Triplex_Roman
      Hershey/Triplex_Italic
      Hershey/Gothic_German
      Hershey/Gothic_English
      Hershey/Gothic_Italian
      Hershey/Symbol_Set_1
      Hershey/Symbol_Set_2
      Hershey/Symbol_Math
      ZapfDingbats
      Script
      15

The first thirteen of these fonts are required for WebCGM. The Microsoft Office CGM import filter implements the 13 standard fonts listed above, and also 'ZapfDingbats' and 'Script'. However, the script font may only be accessed under the name '15'. For more on Microsoft import filter font substitutions, check its help file which you may find here:

 
  C:\\Program Files\\Microsoft Office\\Office\\Cgmimp32.hlp

and/or its configuration file, which you may find here:

 
  C:\\Program Files\\Common Files\\Microsoft Shared\\Grphflt\\Cgmimp32.cfg

In the `set term` command, you may specify a font name which does not appear in the default font table. In that case, a new font table is constructed with the specified font as its first entry. You must ensure that the spelling, capitalization, and spacing of the name are appropriate for the application that will read the CGM file. (Gnuplot and any MIL-D-28003A compliant application ignore case in font names.) If you need to add several new fonts, use several `set term` commands.

Example:

 
      set terminal cgm 'Old English'
      set terminal cgm 'Tengwar'
      set terminal cgm 'Arabic'
      set output 'myfile.cgm'
      plot ...
      set output

You cannot introduce a new font in a label command.

-- FONTSIZE --

Fonts are scaled assuming the page is 6 inches wide. If the size command is used to change the aspect ratio of the page or the CGM file is converted to a different width, the resulting font sizes will be scaled up or down accordingly. To change the assumed width, use the `width` option.

-- LINEWIDTH --

The `linewidth` option sets the width of lines in pt. The default width is 1 pt. Scaling is affected by the actual width of the page, as discussed under the `fontsize` and `width` options.

-- ROTATE --

The `norotate` option may be used to disable text rotation. For example, the CGM input filter for Word for Windows 6.0c can accept rotated text, but the DRAW editor within Word cannot. If you edit a graph (for example, to label a curve), all rotated text is restored to horizontal. The Y axis label will then extend beyond the clip boundary. With `norotate`, the Y axis label starts in a less attractive location, but the page can be edited without damage. The `rotate` option confirms the default behavior.

-- SOLID --

The `solid` option may be used to disable dashed line styles in the plots. This is useful when color is enabled and the dashing of the lines detracts from the appearance of the plot. The `dashed` option confirms the default behavior, which gives a different dash pattern to each curve.

-- SIZE --

Default size of a CGM plot is 32599 units wide and 23457 units high for landscape, or 23457 units wide by 32599 units high for portrait.

-- WIDTH --

All distances in the CGM file are in abstract units. The application that reads the file determines the size of the final plot. By default, the width of the final plot is assumed to be 6 inches (15.24 cm). This distance is used to calculate the correct font size, and may be changed with the `width` option. The keyword should be followed by the width in points. (Here, a point is 1/72 inch, as in PostScript. This unit is known as a "big point" in TeX.) Gnuplot `expressions` can be used to convert from other units.

Example:

 
      set terminal cgm width 432            # default
      set terminal cgm width 6*72           # same as above
      set terminal cgm width 10/2.54*72     # 10 cm wide

-- NOFONTLIST --

The default font table includes the fonts recommended for WebCGM, which are compatible with the Computer Graphics Metafile input filter for Microsoft Office and Corel Draw. Another application might use different fonts and/or different font names, which may not be documented. As a workaround, the `nofontlist` option deletes the font table from the CGM file. In this case, the reading application should use a default table. Gnuplot will still use its own default font table to select font indices. Thus, 'Helvetica' will give you an index of 1, which should get you the first entry in your application's default font table. 'Helvetica Bold' will give you its second entry, etc.

The former `winword6` option is now a deprecated synonym for `nofontlist`. The problems involving the color and font tables that the `winword6` option was intended to work around turned out to be gnuplot bugs which have now been fixed."


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3.1.0.11 corel

The `corel` terminal driver supports CorelDraw.

Syntax:

 
      set terminal corel {  default
                          | {monochrome | color
                               {"<font>" {<fontsize> 
                                  {<xsize> <ysize> {<linewidth> }}}}}

where the fontsize and linewidth are specified in points and the sizes in inches. The defaults are monochrome, "SwitzerlandLight", 22, 8.2, 10 and 1.2."


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3.1.0.12 debug

This terminal is provided to allow for the debugging of `gnuplot`. It is likely to be of use only for users who are modifying the source code."


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3.1.0.13 svga

The `svga` terminal driver supports PCs with SVGA graphics. It can only be used if it is compiled with DJGPP. Its only option is the font.

Syntax:

 
      set terminal svga {"<fontname>"}"


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3.1.0.14 dumb

The `dumb` terminal driver has an optional size specification and trailing linefeed control.

Syntax:

 
      set terminal dumb {[no]feed} {<xsize> <ysize>}
                        {[no]enhanced}

where <xsize> and <ysize> set the size of the dumb terminals. Default is 79 by 24. The last newline is printed only if `feed` is enabled.

Examples:

 
      set term dumb nofeed
      set term dumb 79 49 # VGA screen---why would anyone do that?"


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3.1.0.15 dxf

The `dxf` terminal driver creates pictures that can be imported into AutoCad (Release 10.x). It has no options of its own, but some features of its plots may be modified by other means. The default size is 120x80 AutoCad units, which can be changed by size. `dxf` uses seven colors (white, red, yellow, green, cyan, blue and magenta), which can be changed only by modifying the source file. If a black-and-white plotting device is used, the colors are mapped to differing line thicknesses. See the description of the AutoCad print/plot command."


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3.1.0.16 dxy800a

This terminal driver supports the Roland DXY800A plotter. It has no options."


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3.1.0.17 eepic

The `eepic` terminal driver supports the extended LaTeX picture environment. It is an alternative to the `latex` driver.

The output of this terminal is intended for use with the "eepic.sty" macro package for LaTeX. To use it, you need "eepic.sty", "epic.sty" and a printer driver that supports the "tpic" \\specials. If your printer driver doesn't support those \\specials, "eepicemu.sty" will enable you to use some of them. dvips and dvipdfm do support the "tpic" \\specials.

Syntax:

 
   set terminal eepic {color, dashed, rotate, small, tiny, default, <fontsize>}

Options: You can give options in any order you wish. 'color' causes gnuplot to produce \\color{...} commands so that the graphs are colored. Using this option, you must include \\usepackage{color} in the preambel of your latex document. 'dashed' will allow dashed line types; without this option, only solid lines with varying thickness will be used. 'dashed' and 'color' are mutually exclusive; if 'color' is specified, then 'dashed' will be ignored. 'rotate' will enable true rotated text (by 90 degrees). Otherwise, rotated text will be typeset with letters stacked above each other. If you use this option you must include \\usepackage{graphicx} in the preamble. 'small' will use \\scriptsize symbols as point markers (Probably does not work with TeX, only LaTeX2e). Default is to use the default math size. 'tiny' uses \\scriptscriptstyle symbols. 'default' resets all options to their defaults = no color, no dashed lines, pseudo-rotated (stacked) text, large point symbols. <fontsize> is a number which specifies the font size inside the picture environment; the unit is pt (points), i.e., 10 pt equals approx. 3.5 mm. If fontsize is not specified, then all text inside the picture will be set in \\footnotesize.

Notes: Remember to escape the # character (or other chars meaningful to (La-)TeX) by \\\\ (2 backslashes). It seems that dashed lines become solid lines when the vertices of a plot are too close. (I do not know if that is a general problem with the tpic specials, or if it is caused by a bug in eepic.sty or dvips/dvipdfm.) The default size of an eepic plot is 5x3 inches, which can be scaled by 'set size a,b'. Points, among other things, are drawn using the LaTeX commands "\\Diamond", "\\Box", etc. These commands no longer belong to the LaTeX2e core; they are included in the latexsym package, which is part of the base distribution and thus part of any LaTeX implementation. Please do not forget to use this package. Instead of latexsym, you can also include the amssymb package. All drivers for LaTeX offer a special way of controlling text positioning: If any text string begins with '{', you also need to include a '}' at the end of the text, and the whole text will be centered both horizontally and vertically. If the text string begins with '[', you need to follow this with a position specification (up to two out of t,b,l,r), ']{', the text itself, and finally '}'. The text itself may be anything LaTeX can typeset as an LR-box. '\\rule{}{}'s may help for best positioning.

Examples: set term eepic

 
  output graphs as eepic macros inside a picture environment;
  \\input the resulting file in your LaTeX document.

set term eepic color tiny rotate 8

 
  eepic macros with \\color macros, \\scripscriptsize point markers,
  true rotated text, and all text set with 8pt.

About label positioning: Use gnuplot defaults (mostly sensible, but sometimes not really best):

 
       set title '\\LaTeX\\ -- $ \\gamma $'

Force centering both horizontally and vertically:

 
       set label '{\\LaTeX\\ -- $ \\gamma $}' at 0,0

Specify own positioning (top here):

 
       set xlabel '[t]{\\LaTeX\\ -- $ \\gamma $}'

The other label - account for long ticlabels:

 
       set ylabel '[r]{\\LaTeX\\ -- $ \\gamma $\\rule{7mm}{0pt}}'"


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3.1.0.18 emf

The `emf` terminal generates an Enhanced Metafile Format file. This file format is the metafile standard on MS Win32 Systems.

Syntax:

 
      set terminal emf {<color>} {solid | dashed} {linewidth <X>}
                       {size XX,YY}
                       {"<fontname>"} {<fontsize>}    #old syntax
                       {font "<fontname>,<fontsize>"} #new syntax

<color> is either `color` or `monochrome`; `solid` draws all curves with solid lines, overriding any dashed patterns; `linewidth <factor>` multiplies all line widths by this factor. <font> is the name of a font; and `<fontsize>` is the size of the font in points.

The nominal size of the output image default to 1024x768 in arbitrary units. You may specify a different nominal size using the size option.

The first two options can be in any order. Selecting `default` sets all options to their default values.

Examples:

 
      set terminal emf 'Times Roman Italic' 12
      set terminal emf color solid    # no pesky dashes!"


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3.1.0.19 emxvga

The `emxvga`, `emxvesa` and `vgal` terminal drivers support PCs with SVGA, vesa SVGA and VGA graphics boards, respectively. They are intended to be compiled with "emx-gcc" under either DOS or OS/2. They also need VESA and SVGAKIT maintained by Johannes Martin (JMARTIN@GOOFY.ZDV.UNI-MAINZ.DE) with additions by David J. Liu (liu@phri.nyu.edu).

Syntax:

 
      set terminal emxvga
      set terminal emxvesa {vesa-mode}
      set terminal vgal

The only option is the vesa mode for `emxvesa`, which defaults to G640x480x256."


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3.1.0.20 epson-180dpi

This driver supports a family of Epson printers and derivatives.

`epson-180dpi` and `epson-60dpi` are drivers for Epson LQ-style 24-pin printers with resolutions of 180 and 60 dots per inch, respectively.

`epson-lx800` is a generic 9-pin driver appropriate for printers like the Epson LX-800, the Star NL-10 and NX-1000, the PROPRINTER, and so forth.

`nec-cp6` is generic 24-pin driver that can be used for printers like the NEC CP6 and the Epson LQ-800.

The `okidata` driver supports the 9-pin OKIDATA 320/321 Standard printers.

The `starc` driver is for the Star Color Printer.

The `tandy-60dpi` driver is for the Tandy DMP-130 series of 9-pin, 60-dpi printers.

Only `nec-cp6` has any options.

Syntax:

 
      set terminal nec-cp6 {monochrome | colour | draft}

which defaults to monochrome.

With each of these drivers, a binary copy is required on a PC to print. Do not use `print`--use instead `copy file /b lpt1:`."


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3.1.0.21 excl

The `excl` terminal driver supports Talaris printers such as the EXCL Laser printer and the 1590. It has no options."


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3.1.0.22 hercules

These drivers supports PC monitors with autodetected graphics boards. They can be used only when compiled with Zortech C/C++. None have options."


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3.1.0.23 fig

The `fig` terminal device generates output in the Fig graphics language.

Syntax:

 
      set terminal fig {monochrome | color}
                       {landscape | portrait}
                       {small | big | size <xsize> <ysize>}
                       {metric | inches}
                       {pointsmax <max_points>}
                       {solid | dashed}
                       {fontsize <fsize>}
                       {textnormal | {textspecial texthidden textrigid}}
                       {{thickness|linewidth} <units>}
                       {depth <layer>}
                       {version <number>}

`monochrome` and `color` determine whether the picture is black-and-white or `color`. `small` and `big` produce a 5x3 or 8x5 inch graph in the default `landscape` mode and 3x5 or 5x8 inches in `portrait` mode. size sets (overrides) the size of the drawing area to <xsize>*<ysize> in units of inches or centimeters depending on the `inches` or `metric` setting in effect. The latter settings is also used as default units for editing with "xfig".

`pointsmax <max_points>` sets the maximum number of points per polyline.

`solid` inhibits automatic usage of `dash`ed lines when solid linestyles are used up, which otherwise occurs.

`fontsize` sets the size of the text font to <fsize> points. `textnormal` resets the text flags and selects postscript fonts, `textspecial` sets the text flags for LaTeX specials, `texthidden` sets the hidden flag and `textrigid` the rigid flag.

`depth` sets the default depth layer for all lines and text. The default depth is 10 to leave room for adding material with "xfig" on top of the plot.

version sets the format version of the generated fig output. Currently only versions 3.1 and 3.2 are supported.

`thickness` sets the default line thickness, which is 1 if not specified. Overriding the thickness can be achieved by adding a multiple of 100 to the `linetype` value for a `plot` command. In a similar way the `depth` of plot elements (with respect to the default depth) can be controlled by adding a multiple of 1000 to <linetype>. The depth is then <layer> + <linetype>/1000 and the thickness is (<linetype>%1000)/100 or, if that is zero, the default line thickness. `linewidth` is a synonym for `thickness`.

Additional point-plot symbols are also available with the `fig` driver. The symbols can be used through `pointtype` values % 100 above 50, with different fill intensities controlled by <pointtype> % 5 and outlines in black (for <pointtype> % 10 < 5) or in the current color. Available symbols are

 
        50 - 59:  circles
        60 - 69:  squares
        70 - 79:  diamonds
        80 - 89:  upwards triangles
        90 - 99:  downwards triangles

The size of these symbols is linked to the font size. The depth of symbols is by default one less than the depth for lines to achieve nice error bars. If <pointtype> is above 1000, the depth is <layer> + <pointtype>/1000-1. If <pointtype>%1000 is above 100, the fill color is (<pointtype>%1000)/100-1.

Available fill colors are (from 1 to 9): black, blue, green, cyan, red, magenta, yellow, white and dark blue (in monochrome mode: black for 1 to 6 and white for 7 to 9).

See with for details of <linetype> and <pointtype>.

The `big` option is a substitute for the `bfig` terminal in earlier versions, which is no longer supported.

Examples:

 
      set terminal fig monochrome small pointsmax 1000  # defaults

 
      plot 'file.dat' with points linetype 102 pointtype 759

would produce circles with a blue outline of width 1 and yellow fill color.

 
      plot 'file.dat' using 1:2:3 with err linetype 1 pointtype 554

would produce errorbars with black lines and circles filled red. These circles are one layer above the lines (at depth 9 by default).

To plot the error bars on top of the circles use

 
      plot 'file.dat' using 1:2:3 with err linetype 1 pointtype 2554"


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3.1.0.24 png

Syntax:

 
      set terminal png 
             {{no}transparent} {{no}interlace}
             {{no}truecolor} {rounded|butt}
             {tiny | small | medium | large | giant}
             {font <face> {<pointsize>}}
             {size <x>,<y>} {{no}crop}
             {{no}enhanced}
             {<color0> <color1> <color2> ...}

PNG images are created using libgd, with optional support for TrueType and Adobe Type 1 fonts via libfreetype. Version 1.8 or greater of libgd is required.

`transparent` instructs the driver to generate transparent PNGs. The first color will be the transparent one. Default is `notransparent`.

`interlace` instructs the driver to generate interlaced PNGs. Default is `nointerlace`.

`butt` instructs the driver to use a line drawing method that does not overshoot the desired end point of a line. This setting is only applicable for line widths greater than 1. This setting is most useful when drawing horizontal or vertical lines. Default is `rounded`. Version 2.0 or greater of libgd is required.

PNG plots may be conveniently viewed by piping the output to the 'display' program from the ImageMagick package as follows:

 
               set term png
               set output '| display png:-'

View the output from successive plot commands interactively by hitting <space> in the display window. To save a particular one to disk, left click in the display window and choose save.

Five basic fonts are supported directly by the gd library. These are `tiny` (5x8 pixels), `small` (6x12 pixels), `medium`, (7x13 Bold), `large` (8x16) or `giant` (9x15 pixels). These fonts cannot be scaled or rotated (pure horizontal or vertical text only).

If gnuplot was built with support for TrueType (*.ttf) or Adobe Type 1 (*.pfa) fonts, they may be selected using the 'font <face> {<pointsize>}' option. <face> is either the full pathname to the font file, or a font face name that is assumed to be the first part of a filename in one of the directories listed in the GDFONTPATH environmental variable. That is, 'set term png font "Face"' will look for a font file named either <somedirectory>/Face.ttf or <somedirectory>/Face.pfa. Both TrueType and Adobe Type 1 fonts are fully scalable and may be rotated through any angle. If no font is specified, gnuplot checks the environmental variable GNUPLOT_DEFAULT_GDFONT to see if there is a preferred default font.

`enhanced` enables the enhanced text processing features, (subscripts, superscripts and mixed fonts). See `enhanced` for more information. The full enhanced mode syntax is supported by the PNG/JPEG driver itself, but some of these features are dependent on which version of the underlying libgd library is present, and which fonts are available.

The size <x,y> is given in pixels--it defaults to 640x480. The number of pixels can be also modified by scaling with the size command. `crop` trims blank space from the edges of the completed plot, resulting in a smaller final image size. Default is `nocrop`.

Each color must be of the form 'xrrggbb', where x is the literal character 'x' and 'rrggbb' are the red, green and blue components in hex. For example, 'x00ff00' is green. The background color is set first, then the border colors, then the X & Y axis colors, then the plotting colors. The maximum number of colors that can be set is 256.

Examples:

 
      set terminal png medium size 640,480 \\
                       xffffff x000000 x404040 \\
                       xff0000 xffa500 x66cdaa xcdb5cd \\
                       xadd8e6 x0000ff xdda0dd x9500d3    # defaults

which uses white for the non-transparent background, black for borders, gray for the axes, and red, orange, medium aquamarine, thistle 3, light blue, blue, plum and dark violet for eight plotting colors.

 
      set terminal png font arial 14 size 800,600

which searches for a TrueType font with face name 'arial' in the directory specified by the environment variable GDFONTPATH and 14pt font size.

 
      set terminal png transparent xffffff \\
                       x000000 x202020 x404040 x606060 \\
                       x808080 xA0A0A0 xC0C0C0 xE0E0E0

which uses white for the transparent background, black for borders, dark gray for axes, and a gray-scale for the six plotting colors.


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3.1.0.25 ggi

The `ggi` driver can run on different targets as X or svgalib.

Syntax:

 
   set terminal ggi [acceleration <integer>] [[mode] {mode}]

In X the window cannot be resized using window manager handles, but the mode can be given with the mode option, e.g.:

 
 - V1024x768
 - V800x600
 - V640x480
 - V320x200

Please refer to the ggi documentation for other modes. The 'mode' keyword is optional. It is recommended to select the target by environment variables as explained in the libggi manual page. To get DGA on X, you should for example

 
   bash> export GGI_DISPLAY=DGA
   csh>  setenv GGI_DISPLAY DGA

'acceleration' is only used for targets which report relative pointer motion events (e.g. DGA) and is a strictly positive integer multiplication factor for the relative distances. The default for acceleration is 7.

Examples:

 
   set term ggi acc 10
   set term ggi acc 1 mode V1024x768
   set term ggi V1024x768"


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3.1.0.26 Gnugraph(GNU plotutils)

The `gnugraph` driver produces device-independent output in the GNU plot graphics language. The default size of the PostScript results generated by "plot2ps" is 5 x 3 inches; this can be increased up to about 8.25 x 8.25 by size.

Syntax:

 
      set terminal gnugraph {"<fontname>"} {<fontsize>}
                            {type <pt>} {size "<size>"}

which defaults to 10-point "Courier".

For `type`, the following options are accepted: `X`, `pnm`, `gif`, `ai`, `ps`, `cgm`, `fig`, `pcl5`, `hpgl`, `tek`, and `meta` (default). The size option (default is a4) is passed straight through to plotutils, it's the user's responsibility to provide correct values. Details can be found in the plotutils documentation.

Examples:

 
      set terminal gnugraph type hpgl size "a4"
      set terminal gnugraph size "a4,xoffset=-5mm,yoffset=2.0cm" type pnm

There is a non-GNU version of the `gnugraph` driver which cannot be compiled unless this version is left out."


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3.1.0.27 gpic

The `gpic` terminal driver generates GPIC graphs in the Free Software Foundations's "groff" package. The default size is 5 x 3 inches. The only option is the origin, which defaults to (0,0).

Syntax:

 
      set terminal gpic {<x> <y>}

where `x` and `y` are in inches.

A simple graph can be formatted using

 
      groff -p -mpic -Tps file.pic > file.ps.

The output from pic can be pipe-lined into eqn, so it is possible to put complex functions in a graph with the label and `set {x/y}label` commands. For instance,

 
      set ylab '@space 0 int from 0 to x alpha ( t ) roman d t@'

will label the y axis with a nice integral if formatted with the command:

 
      gpic filename.pic | geqn -d@@ -Tps | groff -m[macro-package] -Tps
          > filename.ps

Figures made this way can be scaled to fit into a document. The pic language is easy to understand, so the graphs can be edited by hand if need be. All co-ordinates in the pic-file produced by `gnuplot` are given as x+gnuplotx and y+gnuploty. By default x and y are given the value 0. If this line is removed with an editor in a number of files, one can put several graphs in one figure like this (default size is 5.0x3.0 inches):

 
      .PS 8.0
      x=0;y=3
      copy "figa.pic"
      x=5;y=3
      copy "figb.pic"
      x=0;y=0
      copy "figc.pic"
      x=5;y=0
      copy "figd.pic"
      .PE

This will produce an 8-inch-wide figure with four graphs in two rows on top of each other.

One can also achieve the same thing by the command

 
      set terminal gpic x y

for example, using

 
      .PS 6.0
      copy "trig.pic"
      .PE"


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3.1.0.28 gpic

The `gpic` terminal driver generates GPIC graphs in the Free Software Foundations's "groff" package. The default size is 5 x 3 inches. The only option is the origin, which defaults to (0,0).

Syntax:

 
      set terminal gpic {<x> <y>}

where `x` and `y` are in inches.

A simple graph can be formatted using

 
      groff -p -mpic -Tps file.pic > file.ps.

The output from pic can be pipe-lined into eqn, so it is possible to put complex functions in a graph with the label and `set {x/y}label` commands. For instance,

 
      set ylab '@space 0 int from 0 to x alpha ( t ) roman d t@'

will label the y axis with a nice integral if formatted with the command:

 
      gpic filename.pic | geqn -d@@ -Tps | groff -m[macro-package] -Tps
          > filename.ps

Figures made this way can be scaled to fit into a document. The pic language is easy to understand, so the graphs can be edited by hand if need be. All co-ordinates in the pic-file produced by `gnuplot` are given as x+gnuplotx and y+gnuploty. By default x and y are given the value 0. If this line is removed with an editor in a number of files, one can put several graphs in one figure like this (default size is 5.0x3.0 inches):

 
      .PS 8.0
      x=0;y=3
      copy "figa.pic"
      x=5;y=3
      copy "figb.pic"
      x=0;y=0
      copy "figc.pic"
      x=5;y=0
      copy "figd.pic"
      .PE

This will produce an 8-inch-wide figure with four graphs in two rows on top of each other.

One can also achieve the same thing by the command

 
      set terminal gpic x y

for example, using

 
      .PS 6.0
      copy "trig.pic"
      .PE"


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3.1.0.29 gpr

The `gpr` terminal driver supports the Apollo Graphics Primitive Resource for a fixed-size window. It has no options.

If a variable window size is desired, use the `apollo` terminal instead."


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3.1.0.30 grass

The `grass` terminal driver gives `gnuplot` capabilities to users of the GRASS geographic information system. Contact grassp-list@moon.cecer.army.mil for more information. Pages are written to the current frame of the GRASS Graphics Window. There are no options."


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3.1.0.31 hp2623a

The `hp2623a` terminal driver supports the Hewlett Packard HP2623A. It has no options."


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3.1.0.32 hp2648

The `hp2648` terminal driver supports the Hewlett Packard HP2647 and HP2648. It has no options."


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3.1.0.33 hp500c

The `hp500c` terminal driver supports the Hewlett Packard HP DeskJet 500c. It has options for resolution and compression.

Syntax:

 
      set terminal hp500c {<res>} {<comp>}

where `res` can be 75, 100, 150 or 300 dots per inch and `comp` can be "rle", or "tiff". Any other inputs are replaced by the defaults, which are 75 dpi and no compression. Rasterization at the higher resolutions may require a large amount of memory."


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3.1.0.34 hpgl

The `hpgl` driver produces HPGL output for devices like the HP7475A plotter. There are two options which can be set: the number of pens and `eject`, which tells the plotter to eject a page when done. The default is to use 6 pens and not to eject the page when done.

The international character sets ISO-8859-1 and CP850 are recognized via `set encoding iso_8859_1` or `set encoding cp850` (see encoding for details).

Syntax:

 
      set terminal hpgl {<number_of_pens>} {eject}

The selection

 
      set terminal hpgl 8 eject

is equivalent to the previous `hp7550` terminal, and the selection

 
      set terminal hpgl 4

is equivalent to the previous `hp7580b` terminal.

The `pcl5` driver supports plotters such as the Hewlett-Packard Designjet 750C, the Hewlett-Packard Laserjet III, and the Hewlett-Packard Laserjet IV. It actually uses HPGL-2, but there is a name conflict among the terminal devices. It has several options which must be specified in the order indicated below:

Syntax:

 
      set terminal pcl5 {mode <mode>} {<plotsize>}
          {{color {<number_of_pens>}} | monochrome} {solid | dashed}
          {font <font>} {size <fontsize>} {pspoints | nopspoints}

<mode> is `landscape` or `portrait`. <plotsize> is the physical plotting size of the plot, which is one of the following: `letter` for standard (8 1/2" X 11") displays, `legal` for (8 1/2" X 14") displays, `noextended` for (36" X 48") displays (a letter size ratio) or, `extended` for (36" X 55") displays (almost a legal size ratio). `color` is for multi-pen (i.e. color) plots, and <number_of_pens> is the number of pens (i.e. colors) used in color plots. `monochrome` is for one (e.g. black) pen plots. `solid` draws all lines as solid lines, or `dashed` will draw lines with different dashed and dotted line patterns. <font> is `stick`, `univers`, `cg_times`, `zapf_dingbats`, `antique_olive`, `arial`, `courier`, `garamond_antigua`, `letter_gothic`, `cg_omega`, `albertus`, `times_new_roman`, `clarendon`, `coronet`, `marigold`, `truetype_symbols`, or `wingdings`. <fontsize> is the font size in points. The point type selection can be the standard default set by specifying `nopspoints`, or the same set of point types found in the postscript terminal by specifying `pspoints`.

Note that built-in support of some of these options is printer device dependent. For instance, all the fonts are supposedly supported by the HP Laserjet IV, but only a few (e.g. univers, stick) may be supported by the HP Laserjet III and the Designjet 750C. Also, color obviously won't work on the the laserjets since they are monochrome devices.

Defaults: landscape, noextended, color (6 pens), solid, univers, 12 point,

 
          and nopspoints.

With `pcl5` international characters are handled by the printer; you just put the appropriate 8-bit character codes into the text strings. You don't need to bother with encoding.

HPGL graphics can be imported by many software packages."


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3.1.0.35 hpljii

The `hpljii` terminal driver supports the HP Laserjet Series II printer. The `hpdj` driver supports the HP DeskJet 500 printer. These drivers allow a choice of resolutions.

Syntax:

 
      set terminal hpljii | hpdj {<res>}

where `res` may be 75, 100, 150 or 300 dots per inch; the default is 75. Rasterization at the higher resolutions may require a large amount of memory.

The `hp500c` terminal is similar to `hpdj`; `hp500c` additionally supports color and compression."


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3.1.0.36 hppj

The `hppj` terminal driver supports the HP PaintJet and HP3630 printers. The only option is the choice of font.

Syntax:

 
      set terminal hppj {FNT5X9 | FNT9X17 | FNT13X25}

with the middle-sized font (FNT9X17) being the default."


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3.1.0.37 imagen

The `imagen` terminal driver supports Imagen laser printers. It is capable of placing multiple graphs on a single page.

Syntax:

 
      set terminal imagen {<fontsize>} {portrait | landscape}
                          {[<horiz>,<vert>]}

where `fontsize` defaults to 12 points and the layout defaults to `landscape`. `<horiz>` and `<vert>` are the number of graphs in the horizontal and vertical directions; these default to unity.

Example:

 
      set terminal imagen portrait [2,3]

puts six graphs on the page in three rows of two in portrait orientation."


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3.1.0.38 iris4d

The `iris4d` terminal driver supports Silicon Graphics IRIS 4D computers. Its only option is 8- or 24-bit color depth. The default is 8.

Syntax:

 
      set terminal iris4d {8 | 24}

The color depth is not really a choice - the value appropriate for the hardware should be selected.

When using 24-bit mode, the colors can be directly specified via the file .gnuplot_iris4d that is searched in the current directory and then in the home directory specified by the HOME environment variable. This file holds RGB values for the background, border, labels and nine plotting colors, in that order. For example, here is a file containing the default colors:

 
      85   85   85     Background   (dark gray)
      0    0    0      Boundary     (black)
      170  0    170    Labeling     (magenta)
      85   255  255    Plot Color 1 (light cyan)
      170  0    0      Plot Color 2 (red)
      0    170  0      Plot Color 3 (green)
      255  85   255    Plot Color 4 (light magenta)
      255  255  85     Plot Color 5 (yellow)
      255  85   85     Plot Color 6 (light red)
      85   255  85     Plot Color 7 (light green)
      0    170  170    Plot Color 8 (cyan)
      170  170  0      Plot Color 9 (brown)

This file must have exactly 12 lines of RGB triples. No empty lines are allowed, and anything after the third number on a line is ignored."


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3.1.0.39 kyo

The `kyo` and `prescribe` terminal drivers support the Kyocera laser printer. The only difference between the two is that `kyo` uses "Helvetica" whereas `prescribe` uses "Courier". There are no options."


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3.1.0.40 latex

Syntax:

 
      set terminal {latex | emtex} {default | {courier|roman} {<fontsize>}}
                   {size <XX>{unit}, <YY>{unit}}

By default the plot will inherit font settings from the embedding document. You have the option of forcing either Courier (cmtt) or Roman (cmr) fonts instead. In this case you may also specify a fontsize. Unless your driver is capable of building fonts at any size (e.g. dvips), stick to the standard 10, 11 and 12 point sizes.

METAFONT users beware: METAFONT does not like odd sizes.

All drivers for LaTeX offer a special way of controlling text positioning: If any text string begins with '{', you also need to include a '}' at the end of the text, and the whole text will be centered both horizontally and vertically. If the text string begins with '[', you need to follow this with a position specification (up to two out of t,b,l,r), ']{', the text itself, and finally '}'. The text itself may be anything LaTeX can typeset as an LR-box. '\\rule{}{}'s may help for best positioning.

Points, among other things, are drawn using the LaTeX commands "\\Diamond" and "\\Box". These commands no longer belong to the LaTeX2e core; they are included in the latexsym package, which is part of the base distribution and thus part of any LaTeX implementation. Please do not forget to use this package.

The default size for the plot is 5 inches by 3 inches. The size option changes this to whatever the user requests. By default the X and Y sizes are taken to be in inches, but other units are possible (currently only cm).

Examples: About label positioning: Use gnuplot defaults (mostly sensible, but sometimes not really best):

 
       set title '\\LaTeX\\ -- $ \\gamma $'

Force centering both horizontally and vertically:

 
       set label '{\\LaTeX\\ -- $ \\gamma $}' at 0,0

Specify own positioning (top here):

 
       set xlabel '[t]{\\LaTeX\\ -- $ \\gamma $}'

The other label - account for long ticlabels:

 
       set ylabel '[r]{\\LaTeX\\ -- $ \\gamma $\\rule{7mm}{0pt}}'"


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3.1.0.41 linux

The `linux` driver has no additional options to specify. It looks at the environment variable GSVGAMODE for the default mode; if not set, it uses 1024x768x256 as default mode or, if that is not possible, 640x480x16 (standard VGA)."


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3.1.0.42 linux

The `linux` driver has no additional options to specify. It looks at the environment variable GSVGAMODE for the default mode; if not set, it uses 1024x768x256 as default mode or, if that is not possible, 640x480x16 (standard VGA)."


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3.1.0.43 macintosh

Several options may be set in the 'macintosh' driver.

Syntax:

 
     set terminal macintosh {singlewin | multiwin} {vertical | novertical}
                            {size <width>, <height> | default}

'singlewin' limits the output to a single window and is useful for animations. 'multiwin' allows multiple windows. 'vertical' is only valid under the gx option. With this option, rotated text

 
    be drawn vertically. novertical turns this option off.
 size <width>, <height> overrides the graph size set in the preferences
    dialog until it is cleared with either 'set term mac size default'
    or 'set term mac default'.

 
 'set term mac size default' sets the window size settings to those set in
    the preferences dialog.

 
 'set term mac default' sets all options to their default values.
    Default values: nogx, multiwin, novertical.

 
 If you generate graphs under the multiwin option and then switch to singlewin,
 the next plot command will cause one more window to be created. This new
 window will be reused as long as singlewin is in effect. If you switch back
 to multiwin, generate some graphs, and then switch to singlewin again, the
 orginal 'singlewin' window will be resused if it is still open. Otherwise
 a new 'singlewin' window will be created. The 'singlewin' window is not numbered."


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3.1.0.44 mf

The `mf` terminal driver creates an input file to the METAFONT program. Thus a figure may be used in the TeX document in the same way as is a character.

To use a picture in a document, the METAFONT program must be run with the output file from `gnuplot` as input. Thus, the user needs a basic knowledge of the font creating process and the procedure for including a new font in a document. However, if the METAFONT program is set up properly at the local site, an unexperienced user could perform the operation without much trouble.

The text support is based on a METAFONT character set. Currently the Computer Modern Roman font set is input, but the user is in principal free to choose whatever fonts he or she needs. The METAFONT source files for the chosen font must be available. Each character is stored in a separate picture variable in METAFONT. These variables may be manipulated (rotated, scaled etc.) when characters are needed. The drawback is the interpretation time in the METAFONT program. On some machines (i.e. PC) the limited amount of memory available may also cause problems if too many pictures are stored.

The `mf` terminal has no options.

-- METAFONT INSTRUCTIONS --

- Set your terminal to METAFONT:

 
  set terminal mf

- Select an output-file, e.g.:

 
  set output "myfigures.mf"

- Create your pictures. Each picture will generate a separate character. Its default size will be 5*3 inches. You can change the size by saying `set size 0.5,0.5` or whatever fraction of the default size you want to have.

- Quit `gnuplot`.

- Generate a TFM and GF file by running METAFONT on the output of `gnuplot`. Since the picture is quite large (5*3 in), you will have to use a version of METAFONT that has a value of at least 150000 for memmax. On Unix systems these are conventionally installed under the name bigmf. For the following assume that the command virmf stands for a big version of METAFONT. For example:

- Invoke METAFONT:

 
    virmf '&plain'

- Select the output device: At the METAFONT prompt ('*') type:

 
    \\mode:=CanonCX;     % or whatever printer you use

- Optionally select a magnification:

 
    mag:=1;             % or whatever you wish

- Input the `gnuplot`-file:

 
    input myfigures.mf

On a typical Unix machine there will usually be a script called "mf" that executes virmf '&plain', so you probably can substitute mf for virmf &plain. This will generate two files: mfput.tfm and mfput.$$$gf (where $$$ indicates the resolution of your device). The above can be conveniently achieved by typing everything on the command line, e.g.: virmf '&plain' '\\mode:=CanonCX; mag:=1; input myfigures.mf' In this case the output files will be named myfigures.tfm and myfigures.300gf.

- Generate a PK file from the GF file using gftopk:

 
  gftopk myfigures.300gf myfigures.300pk

The name of the output file for gftopk depends on the DVI driver you use. Ask your local TeX administrator about the naming conventions. Next, either install the TFM and PK files in the appropriate directories, or set your environment variables properly. Usually this involves setting TEXFONTS to include the current directory and doing the same thing for the environment variable that your DVI driver uses (no standard name here...). This step is necessary so that TeX will find the font metric file and your DVI driver will find the PK file.

- To include your pictures in your document you have to tell TeX the font:

 
  \\font\\gnufigs=myfigures

Each picture you made is stored in a single character. The first picture is character 0, the second is character 1, and so on... After doing the above step, you can use the pictures just like any other characters. Therefore, to place pictures 1 and 2 centered in your document, all you have to do is:

 
  \\centerline{\\gnufigs\\char0}
  \\centerline{\\gnufigs\\char1}

in plain TeX. For LaTeX you can, of course, use the picture environment and place the picture wherever you wish by using the \\makebox and \\put macros.

This conversion saves you a lot of time once you have generated the font; TeX handles the pictures as characters and uses minimal time to place them, and the documents you make change more often than the pictures do. It also saves a lot of TeX memory. One last advantage of using the METAFONT driver is that the DVI file really remains device independent, because no \\special commands are used as in the eepic and tpic drivers."


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3.1.0.45 mp

The `mp` driver produces output intended to be input to the Metapost program. Running Metapost on the file creates EPS files containing the plots. By default, Metapost passes all text through TeX. This has the advantage of allowing essentially any TeX symbols in titles and labels.

Syntax:

 
   set term mp {color | colour | monochrome}
               {solid | dashed}
               {notex | tex | latex}
               {magnification <magsize>}
               {psnfss | psnfss-version7 | nopsnfss}
               {prologues <value>}
               {a4paper}
               {amstex}
               {"<fontname>"} {<fontsize>}

The option `color` causes lines to be drawn in color (on a printer or display that supports it), `monochrome` (or nothing) selects black lines. The option `solid` draws solid lines, while `dashed` (or nothing) selects lines with different patterns of dashes. If `solid` is selected but `color` is not, nearly all lines will be identical. This may occasionally be useful, so it is allowed.

The option `notex` bypasses TeX entirely, therefore no TeX code can be used in labels under this option. This is intended for use on old plot files or files that make frequent use of common characters like `$` and `%` that require special handling in TeX.

The option `tex` sets the terminal to output its text for TeX to process.

The option `latex` sets the terminal to output its text for processing by LaTeX. This allows things like \\frac for fractions which LaTeX knows about but TeX does not. Note that you must set the environment variable TEX to the name of your LaTeX executable (normally latex) if you use this option or use `mpost -tex=<name of LaTeX executable> ...`. Otherwise metapost will try and use TeX to process the text and it won't work.

Changing font sizes in TeX has no effect on the size of mathematics, and there is no foolproof way to make such a change, except by globally setting a magnification factor. This is the purpose of the `magnification` option. It must be followed by a scaling factor. All text (NOT the graphs) will be scaled by this factor. Use this if you have math that you want at some size other than the default 10pt. Unfortunately, all math will be the same size, but see the discussion below on editing the MP output. `mag` will also work under `notex` but there seems no point in using it as the font size option (below) works as well.

The option `psnfss` uses postscript fonts in combination with LaTeX. Since this option only makes sense, if LaTeX is being used, the `latex` option is selected automatically. This option includes the following packages for LaTeX: inputenc(latin1), fontenc(T1), mathptmx, helvet(scaled=09.2), courier, latexsym and textcomp.

The option `psnfss-version7` uses also postscript fonts in LaTeX (option `latex` is also automatically selected), but uses the following packages with LaTeX: inputenc(latin1), fontenc(T1), times, mathptmx, helvet and courier.

The option `nopsnfss` is the default and uses the standard font (cmr10 if not otherwise specified).

The option `prologues` takes a value as an additional argument and adds the line `prologues:=<value>` to the metapost file. If a value of `2` is specified metapost uses postscript fonts to generate the eps-file, so that the result can be viewed using e.g. ghostscript. Normally the output of metapost uses TeX fonts and therefore has to be included in a (La)TeX file before you can look at it.

The option `noprologues` is the default. No additional line specifying the prologue will be added.

The option `a4paper` adds a `[a4paper]` to the documentclass. Normally letter paper is used (default). Since this option is only used in case of LaTeX, the `latex` option is selected automatically.

The option `amstex` automatically selects the `latex` option and includes the following LaTeX packages: amsfonts, amsmath(intlimits). By default these packages are not included.

A name in quotes selects the font that will be used when no explicit font is given in a label or `set title`. A name recognized by TeX (a TFM file exists) must be used. The default is "cmr10" unless `notex` is selected, then it is "pcrr8r" (Courier). Even under `notex`, a TFM file is needed by Metapost. The file `pcrr8r.tfm` is the name given to Courier in LaTeX's psnfss package. If you change the font from the `notex` default, choose a font that matches the ASCII encoding at least in the range 32-126. `cmtt10` almost works, but it has a nonblank character in position 32 (space).

The size can be any number between 5.0 and 99.99. If it is omitted, 10.0 is used. It is advisable to use `magstep` sizes: 10 times an integer or half-integer power of 1.2, rounded to two decimals, because those are the most available sizes of fonts in TeX systems.

All the options are optional. If font information is given, it must be at the end, with size (if present) last. The size is needed to select a size for the font, even if the font name includes size information. For example, `set term mp "cmtt12"` selects cmtt12 shrunk to the default size 10. This is probably not what you want or you would have used cmtt10.

The following common ascii characters need special treatment in TeX:

 
   $, &, #, %, _;  |, <, >;  ^, ~,  \\, {, and }

The five characters $, #, &, _, and % can simply be escaped, e.g., `\\$`. The three characters <, >, and | can be wrapped in math mode, e.g., `$<$`. The remainder require some TeX work-arounds. Any good book on TeX will give some guidance.

If you type your labels inside double quotes, backslashes in TeX code need to be escaped (doubled). Using single quotes will avoid having to do this, but then you cannot use `\\n` for line breaks. As of this writing, version 3.7 of gnuplot processes titles given in a `plot` command differently than in other places, and backslashes in TeX commands need to be doubled regardless of the style of quotes.

Metapost pictures are typically used in TeX documents. Metapost deals with fonts pretty much the same way TeX does, which is different from most other document preparation programs. If the picture is included in a LaTeX document using the graphics package, or in a plainTeX document via epsf.tex, and then converted to PostScript with dvips (or other dvi-to-ps converter), the text in the plot will usually be handled correctly. However, the text may not appear if you send the Metapost output as-is to a PostScript interpreter.

-- METAPOST INSTRUCTIONS --

- Set your terminal to Metapost, e.g.:

 
   set terminal mp mono "cmtt12" 12

- Select an output-file, e.g.:

 
   set output "figure.mp"

- Create your pictures. Each plot (or multiplot group) will generate a separate Metapost beginfig...endfig group. Its default size will be 5 by 3 inches. You can change the size by saying `set size 0.5,0.5` or whatever fraction of the default size you want to have.

- Quit gnuplot.

- Generate EPS files by running Metapost on the output of gnuplot:

 
   mpost figure.mp  OR  mp figure.mp

The name of the Metapost program depends on the system, typically `mpost` for a Unix machine and `mp` on many others. Metapost will generate one EPS file for each picture.

- To include your pictures in your document you can use the graphics package in LaTeX or epsf.tex in plainTeX:

 
   \\usepackage{graphics} % LaTeX
   \\input epsf.tex       % plainTeX

If you use a driver other than dvips for converting TeX DVI output to PS, you may need to add the following line in your LaTeX document:

 
   \\DeclareGraphicsRule{*}{eps}{*}{}

Each picture you made is in a separate file. The first picture is in, e.g., figure.0, the second in figure.1, and so on.... To place the third picture in your document, for example, all you have to do is:

 
   \\includegraphics{figure.2} % LaTeX
   \\epsfbox{figure.2}         % plainTeX

The advantage, if any, of the mp terminal over a postscript terminal is editable output. Considerable effort went into making this output as clean as possible. For those knowledgeable in the Metapost language, the default line types and colors can be changed by editing the arrays `lt[]` and `col[]`. The choice of solid vs dashed lines, and color vs black lines can be change by changing the values assigned to the booleans `dashedlines` and `colorlines`. If the default `tex` option was in effect, global changes to the text of labels can be achieved by editing the `vebatimtex...etex` block. In particular, a LaTeX preamble can be added if desired, and then LaTeX's built-in size changing commands can be used for maximum flexibility. Be sure to set the appropriate MP configuration variable to force Metapost to run LaTeX instead of plainTeX."


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3.1.0.46 mgr

The `mgr` terminal driver supports the Mgr Window system. It has no options."


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3.1.0.47 mif

The `mif` terminal driver produces Frame Maker MIF format version 3.00. It plots in MIF Frames with the size 15*10 cm, and plot primitives with the same pen will be grouped in the same MIF group. Plot primitives in a `gnuplot` page will be plotted in a MIF Frame, and several MIF Frames are collected in one large MIF Frame. The MIF font used for text is "Times".

Several options may be set in the MIF 3.00 driver.

Syntax:

 
      set terminal mif {color | colour | monochrome} {polyline | vectors}
                       {help | ?}

`colour` plots lines with line types >= 0 in colour (MIF sep. 2-7) and `monochrome` plots all line types in black (MIF sep. 0). `polyline` plots curves as continuous curves and `vectors` plots curves as collections of vectors. help and `?` print online help on standard error output--both print a short description of the usage; help also lists the options.

Examples:

 
      set term mif colour polylines    # defaults
      set term mif                     # defaults
      set term mif vectors
      set term mif help"


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3.1.0.48 mtos

The `mtos` terminal has no options. It sends data via a pipe to an external program called GPCLIENT. It runs under MULTITOS, Magic 3.x, MagicMAC. and MiNT. If you cannot find GPCLIENT, than mail to dirk@lstm.uni-erlangen.de."


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3.1.0.49 next

Several options may be set in the next driver.

Syntax:

 
      set terminal next {<mode>} {<type> } {<color>} {<dashed>}
                 {"<fontname>"} {<fontsize>} title {"<newtitle>"}

where <mode> is `default`, which sets all options to their defaults; <type> is either `new` or `old`, where `old` invokes the old single window; <color> is either `color` or `monochrome`; <dashed> is either `solid` or `dashed`; "<fontname>" is the name of a valid PostScript font; <fontsize> is the size of the font in PostScript points; and <title> is the title for the GnuTerm window. Defaults are `new`, `monochrome`, `dashed`, "Helvetica", 14pt.

Examples:

 
      set term next default
      set term next 22
      set term next color "Times-Roman" 14
      set term next color "Helvetica" 12 title "MyPlot"
      set term next old

Pointsizes may be changed with `set linestyle`."


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3.1.0.50 Openstep (next)

/*

*/ Several options may be set in the openstep (next) driver.

Syntax:

 
      set terminal openstep {<mode>} {<type> } {<color>} {<dashed>}
                 {"<fontname>"} {<fontsize>} title {"<newtitle>"}

where <mode> is `default`, which sets all options to their defaults; <type> is either `new` or `old`, where `old` invokes the old single window; <color> is either `color` or `monochrome`; <dashed> is either `solid` or `dashed`; "<fontname>" is the name of a valid PostScript font; <fontsize> is the size of the font in PostScript points; and <title> is the title for the GnuTerm window. Defaults are `new`, `monochrome`, `dashed`, "Helvetica", 14pt.

Examples:

 
      set term openstep default
      set term openstep 22
      set term openstep color "Times-Roman" 14
      set term openstep color "Helvetica" 12 title "MyPlot"
      set term openstep old

Pointsizes may be changed with `set linestyle`."


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3.1.0.51 pbm

Several options may be set in the `pbm` terminal--the driver for PBMplus.

Syntax:

 
      set terminal pbm {<fontsize>} {<mode>} {size <x>,<y>}

where <fontsize> is `small`, `medium`, or `large` and <mode> is `monochrome`, `gray` or `color`. The default plot size is 640 pixels wide and 480 pixels high.

The output of the `pbm` driver depends upon <mode>: `monochrome` produces a portable bitmap (one bit per pixel), `gray` a portable graymap (three bits per pixel) and `color` a portable pixmap (color, four bits per pixel).

The output of this driver can be used with various image conversion and manipulation utilities provided by NETPBM. Based on Jef Poskanzer's PBMPLUS package, NETPBM provides programs to convert the above PBM formats to GIF, TIFF, MacPaint, Macintosh PICT, PCX, X11 bitmap and many others. Complete information is available at http://netpbm.sourceforge.net/.

Examples:

 
      set terminal pbm small monochrome                # defaults
      set terminal pbm color medium size 800,600
      set output '| pnmrotate 45 | pnmtopng > tilted.png'  # uses NETPBM"


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3.1.0.52 dospc

The `dospc` terminal driver supports PCs with arbitrary graphics boards, which will be automatically detected. It should be used only if you are not using the gcc or Zortec C/C++ compilers."


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3.1.0.53 pdf

This terminal produces files in the Adobe Portable Document Format (PDF), useable for printing or display with tools like Acrobat Reader

Syntax:

 
      set terminal pdf {monochrome|color|colour}
                       {{no}enhanced}
                       {fname "<font>"} {fsize <fontsize>}
                       {font "<fontname>{,<fontsize>}"}
                       {linewidth <lw>} {rounded|butt}
                       {solid|dashed} {dl <dashlength>}}
                       {size <XX>{unit},<YY>{unit}}

The default is to use a different color for each line type. Selecting `monochome` will use black for all linetypes, in which case you probably want to select `dashed` to distinguish line types. Even in in mono mode you can still use explicit colors for filled areas or linestyles.

where <font> is the name of the default font to use (default Helvetica) and <fontsize> is the font size (in points, default 12). For help on which fonts are available or how to install new ones, please see the documentation for your local installation of pdflib.

The `enhanced` option enables enhanced text processing features (subscripts, superscripts and mixed fonts). See `enhanced`.

The width of all lines in the plot can be increased by the factor <n> specified in `linewidth`. Similarly `dashlength` is a multiplier for the default dash spacing.

`rounded` sets line caps and line joins to be rounded; `butt` is the default, butt caps and mitered joins.

The default size for PDF output is 5 inches by 3 inches. The size option changes this to whatever the user requests. By default the X and Y sizes are taken to be in inches, but other units are possible (currently only cm).

* does not work.


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3.1.0.54 pstricks

The `pstricks` driver is intended for use with the "pstricks.sty" macro package for LaTeX. It is an alternative to the `eepic` and `latex` drivers. You need "pstricks.sty", and, of course, a printer that understands PostScript, or a converter such as Ghostscript.

PSTricks is available via anonymous ftp from the /pub directory at Princeton.edu. This driver definitely does not come close to using the full capability of the PSTricks package.

Syntax:

 
      set terminal pstricks {hacktext | nohacktext} {unit | nounit}

The first option invokes an ugly hack that gives nicer numbers; the second has to do with plot scaling. The defaults are `hacktext` and `nounit`."


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3.1.0.55 qms

The `qms` terminal driver supports the QMS/QUIC Laser printer, the Talaris 1200 and others. It has no options."


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3.1.0.56 regis

The `regis` terminal device generates output in the REGIS graphics language. It has the option of using 4 (the default) or 16 colors.

Syntax:

 
      set terminal regis {4 | 16}"


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3.1.0.57 regis

The `regis` terminal device generates output in the REGIS graphics language. It has the option of using 4 (the default) or 16 colors.

Syntax:

 
      set terminal regis {4 | 16}"


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3.1.0.58 rgip

The `rgip` and `uniplex` terminal drivers support RGIP metafiles. They can combine several graphs on a single page, but only one page is allowed in a given output file.

Syntax:

 
      set terminal rgip | uniplex {portrait | landscape}
                                  {[<horiz>,<vert>]} {<fontsize>}

permissible values for the font size are in the range 1-8, with the default being 1. The default layout is landscape. Graphs are placed on the page in a `horiz`x`vert` grid, which defaults to [1,1].

Example:

 
      set terminal uniplex portrait [2,3]

puts six graphs on a page in three rows of two in portrait orientation."


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3.1.0.59 sun

The `sun` terminal driver supports the SunView window system. It has no options."


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3.1.0.60 svg

This terminal produces files in the W3C Scalable Vector Graphics format.

Syntax:

 
      set terminal svg {size <x>,<y> {|fixed|dynamic}}
                       {{no}enhanced}
                       {fname "<font>"} {fsize <fontsize>}
                       {font "<fontname>{,<fontsize>}"}
                       {fontfile <filename>}
                       {rounded|butt} {linewidth <lw>}

where <x> and <y> are the size of the SVG plot to generate, `dynamic` allows a svg-viewer to resize plot, whereas the default setting, `fixed`, will request an absolute size.

`linewidth <w>` increases the width of all lines used in the figure by a factor of <w>.

<font> is the name of the default font to use (default Arial) and <fontsize> is the font size (in points, default 12). Gnuplot does not currently provide a mechanism for embedding fonts in the output file, so svg viewing programs may substitute other fonts when the file is displayed.

The svg terminal supports an enhanced text mode, which allows font and other formatting commands to be embedded in labels and other text strings. The enhanced text mode syntax is shared with other gnuplot terminal types. See `enhanced` for more details.

SVG allows you to embed fonts directly into an SVG document, or to provide a hypertext link to the desired font. The `fontfile` option specifies a local file which is copied into the <defs> section of the resulting SVG output file. This file may either itself contain a font, or may contain the records necessary to create a hypertext reference to the desired font. Gnuplot will look for the requested file using the directory list in the GNUPLOT_FONTPATH environmental variable."


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3.1.0.61 tek410x

The `tek410x` terminal driver supports the 410x and 420x family of Tektronix terminals. It has no options."


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3.1.0.62 tek410x

The `tek410x` terminal driver supports the 410x and 420x family of Tektronix terminals. It has no options."


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3.1.0.63 tek40

This family of terminal drivers supports a variety of VT-like terminals. `tek40xx` supports Tektronix 4010 and others as well as most TEK emulators; `vttek` supports VT-like tek40xx terminal emulators; `kc-tek40xx` supports MS-DOS Kermit Tek4010 terminal emulators in color: `km-tek40xx` supports them in monochrome; `selanar` supports Selanar graphics; and `bitgraph` supports BBN Bitgraph terminals. None have any options."


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3.1.0.64 texdraw

The `texdraw` terminal driver supports the LaTeX texdraw environment. It is intended for use with "texdraw.sty" and "texdraw.tex" in the texdraw package.

Points, among other things, are drawn using the LaTeX commands "\\Diamond" and "\\Box". These commands no longer belong to the LaTeX2e core; they are included in the latexsym package, which is part of the base distribution and thus part of any LaTeX implementation. Please do not forget to use this package.

It has no options."


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3.1.0.65 tgif

Tgif is an X11-based drawing tool--it has nothing to do with GIF.

The `tgif` driver supports different pointsizes (with pointsize), different label fonts and font sizes (e.g. `set label "Hallo" at x,y font "Helvetica,34"`) and multiple graphs on the page. The proportions of the axes are not changed.

Syntax:

 
      set terminal tgif {portrait | landscape | default} {<[x,y]>}
                        {monochrome | color}
                        {{linewidth | lw} <LW>}
                        {solid | dashed}
                        {font "<fontname>"} {<fontsize>}

where <[x,y]> specifies the number of graphs in the x and y directions on the page, `color` enables color, `linewidth` scales all linewidths by <LW>, "<fontname>" is the name of a valid PostScript font, and <fontsize> specifies the size of the PostScript font. `defaults` sets all options to their defaults: `portrait`, `[1,1]`, `color`, `linwidth 1.0`, `dashed`, `"Helvetica"`, and `18`.

The `solid` option is usually prefered if lines are colored, as they often are in the editor. Hardcopy will be black-and-white, so `dashed` should be chosen for that.

Multiplot is implemented in two different ways.

The first multiplot implementation is the standard gnuplot multiplot feature:

 
      set terminal tgif
      set output "file.obj"
      set multiplot
      set origin x01,y01
      set size  xs,ys
      plot ...
           ...
      set origin x02,y02
      plot ...
      unset multiplot

See multiplot for further information.

The second version is the [x,y] option for the driver itself. The advantage of this implementation is that everything is scaled and placed automatically without the need for setting origins and sizes; the graphs keep their natural x/y proportions of 3/2 (or whatever is fixed by size).

If both multiplot methods are selected, the standard method is chosen and a warning message is given.

Examples of single plots (or standard multiplot):

 
      set terminal tgif                  # defaults
      set terminal tgif "Times-Roman" 24
      set terminal tgif landscape
      set terminal tgif landscape solid

Examples using the built-in multiplot mechanism:

 
      set terminal tgif portrait [2,4]  # portrait; 2 plots in the x-
                                        # and 4 in the y-direction
      set terminal tgif [1,2]           # portrait; 1 plot in the x-
                                        # and 2 in the y-direction
      set terminal tgif landscape [3,3] # landscape; 3 plots in both
                                        # directions"


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3.1.0.66 tgif

Tgif is an X11-based drawing tool--it has nothing to do with GIF.

The `tgif` driver supports different pointsizes (with pointsize), different label fonts and font sizes (e.g. `set label "Hallo" at x,y font "Helvetica,34"`) and multiple graphs on the page. The proportions of the axes are not changed.

Syntax:

 
      set terminal tgif {portrait | landscape | default} {<[x,y]>}
                        {monochrome | color}
                        {{linewidth | lw} <LW>}
                        {solid | dashed}
                        {font "<fontname>"} {<fontsize>}

where <[x,y]> specifies the number of graphs in the x and y directions on the page, `color` enables color, `linewidth` scales all linewidths by <LW>, "<fontname>" is the name of a valid PostScript font, and <fontsize> specifies the size of the PostScript font. `defaults` sets all options to their defaults: `portrait`, `[1,1]`, `color`, `linwidth 1.0`, `dashed`, `"Helvetica"`, and `18`.

The `solid` option is usually prefered if lines are colored, as they often are in the editor. Hardcopy will be black-and-white, so `dashed` should be chosen for that.

Multiplot is implemented in two different ways.

The first multiplot implementation is the standard gnuplot multiplot feature:

 
      set terminal tgif
      set output "file.obj"
      set multiplot
      set origin x01,y01
      set size  xs,ys
      plot ...
           ...
      set origin x02,y02
      plot ...
      unset multiplot

See multiplot for further information.

The second version is the [x,y] option for the driver itself. The advantage of this implementation is that everything is scaled and placed automatically without the need for setting origins and sizes; the graphs keep their natural x/y proportions of 3/2 (or whatever is fixed by size).

If both multiplot methods are selected, the standard method is chosen and a warning message is given.

Examples of single plots (or standard multiplot):

 
      set terminal tgif                  # defaults
      set terminal tgif "Times-Roman" 24
      set terminal tgif landscape
      set terminal tgif landscape solid

Examples using the built-in multiplot mechanism:

 
      set terminal tgif portrait [2,4]  # portrait; 2 plots in the x-
                                        # and 4 in the y-direction
      set terminal tgif [1,2]           # portrait; 1 plot in the x-
                                        # and 2 in the y-direction
      set terminal tgif landscape [3,3] # landscape; 3 plots in both
                                        # directions"


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3.1.0.67 tkcanvas

This terminal driver generates Tk canvas widget commands based on Tcl/Tk (default) or Perl. To use it, rebuild `gnuplot` (after uncommenting or inserting the appropriate line in "term.h"), then

 
 gnuplot> set term tkcanvas {perltk} {interactive}
 gnuplot> set output 'plot.file'

After invoking "wish", execute the following sequence of Tcl/Tk commands:

 
 % source plot.file
 % canvas .c
 % pack .c
 % gnuplot .c

Or, for Perl/Tk use a program like this:

 
 use Tk;
 my $top = MainWindow->new;
 my $c = $top->Canvas->pack;
 my $gnuplot = do "plot.pl";
 $gnuplot->($c);
 MainLoop;

The code generated by `gnuplot` creates a procedure called "gnuplot" that takes the name of a canvas as its argument. When the procedure is called, it clears the canvas, finds the size of the canvas and draws the plot in it, scaled to fit.

For 2-dimensional plotting (`plot`) two additional procedures are defined: "gnuplot_plotarea" will return a list containing the borders of the plotting area "xleft, xright, ytop, ybot" in canvas screen coordinates, while the ranges of the two axes "x1min, x1max, y1min, y1max, x2min, x2max, y2min, y2max" in plot coordinates can be obtained calling "gnuplot_axisranges". If the "interactive" option is specified, mouse clicking on a line segment will print the coordinates of its midpoint to stdout. Advanced actions can happen instead if the user supplies a procedure named "user_gnuplot_coordinates", which takes the following arguments: "win id x1s y1s x2s y2s x1e y1e x2e y2e x1m y1m x2m y2m", the name of the canvas and the id of the line segment followed by the coordinates of its start and end point in the two possible axis ranges; the coordinates of the midpoint are only filled for logarithmic axes.

The current version of `tkcanvas` supports neither multiplot nor replot."


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3.1.0.68 tpic

The `tpic` terminal driver supports the LaTeX picture environment with tpic \\specials. It is an alternative to the `latex` and `eepic` terminal drivers. Options are the point size, line width, and dot-dash interval.

Syntax:

 
      set terminal tpic <pointsize> <linewidth> <interval>

where pointsize and `linewidth` are integers in milli-inches and `interval` is a float in inches. If a non-positive value is specified, the default is chosen: pointsize = 40, linewidth = 6, interval = 0.1.

All drivers for LaTeX offer a special way of controlling text positioning: If any text string begins with '{', you also need to include a '}' at the end of the text, and the whole text will be centered both horizontally and vertically by LaTeX. -- If the text string begins with '[', you need to continue it with: a position specification (up to two out of t,b,l,r), ']{', the text itself, and finally, '}'. The text itself may be anything LaTeX can typeset as an LR-box. \\rule{}{}'s may help for best positioning.

Examples: About label positioning: Use gnuplot defaults (mostly sensible, but sometimes not really best):

 
       set title '\\LaTeX\\ -- $ \\gamma $'

Force centering both horizontally and vertically:

 
       set label '{\\LaTeX\\ -- $ \\gamma $}' at 0,0

Specify own positioning (top here):

 
       set xlabel '[t]{\\LaTeX\\ -- $ \\gamma $}'

The other label - account for long ticlabels:

 
       set ylabel '[r]{\\LaTeX\\ -- $ \\gamma $\\rule{7mm}{0pt}}'"


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3.1.0.69 unixpc

The `unixpc` terminal driver supports AT&T 3b1 and AT&T 7300 Unix PC. It has no options."


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3.1.0.70 unixplot

The `unixplot` terminal driver generates output in the Unix "plot" graphics language. It has no options.

This terminal cannot be compiled if the GNU version of plot is to be used; in that case, use the `gnugraph` terminal instead."


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3.1.0.71 vx384

The `vx384` terminal driver supports the Vectrix 384 and Tandy color printers. It has no options."


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3.1.0.72 vgagl

The `vgagl` driver is a fast linux console driver with full mouse and pm3d support. It looks at the environment variable SVGALIB_DEFAULT_MODE for the default mode; if not set, it uses a 256 color mode with the highest available resolution.

Syntax:

 
   set terminal vgagl \\
                background [red] [[green] [blue]] \\
                [uniform | interpolate] \\
                [dump "file"] \\
                [mode]

The color mode can also be given with the mode option. Both Symbolic names as G1024x768x256 and integers are allowed. The `background` option takes either one or three integers in the range [0, 255]. If only one integers is supplied, it is taken as gray value for the background. If three integers are present, the background gets the corresponding color. The (mutually exclusive) options `interpolate` and `uniform` control if color interpolation is done while drawing triangles (on by default).

A file can be specified with the `dump "file"` option. If this option is present, (i.e the dump file name is not empty) pressing the key KP_Delete will write the file. This action cannot and cannot be rebound. The file is written in raw ppm (P6) format. Note that this option is reset each time the `set term` command is issued.

To get high resolution modes, you will probably have to modify the configuration file of libvga, usually /etc/vga/libvga.conf. Using the VESA fb is a good choice, but this needs to be compiled in the kernel.

The vgagl driver uses the first *available* vga mode from the following list:

 
 - the driver which was supplied when setting vgagl, e.g. `set term vgagl
   G1024x768x256` would first check, if the G1024x768x256 mode is available.
 - the environment variable SVGALIB_DEFAULT_MODE
 - G1024x768x256
 - G800x600x256
 - G640x480x256
 - G320x200x256
 - G1280x1024x256
 - G1152x864x256
 - G1360x768x256
 - G1600x1200x256


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3.1.0.73 VWS

The `VWS` terminal driver supports the VAX Windowing System. It has no options. It will sense the display type (monochrome, gray scale, or color.) All line styles are plotted as solid lines."


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3.1.0.74 windows

Three options may be set in the `windows` terminal driver.

Syntax:

 
      set terminal windows {color | monochrome}
                           {enhanced | noenhanced}
                           {{font} "fontname{,fontsize}" {<fontsize>}}

where `color` and `monochrome` select colored or mono output, `enhanced` enables enhanced text mode features (subscripts, superscripts and mixed fonts). See `enhanced` for more information. `"<fontname>"` is the name of a valid Windows font, and `<fontsize>` is the size of the font in points.

Other options may be set with the graph-menu, the initialization file, and `set linestyle`. Note that there is one restriction imposed by the classic Windows GDI interface: modifiable linewidth only works with solid lines, not with dotted or dashed ones. /* Does this really belong here? If not, someone move it where it does. */

The Windows version normally terminates immediately as soon as the end of any files given as command line arguments is reached (i.e. in non-interactive mode), unless you specify `-` as the last command line option. It will also not show the text-window at all, in this mode, only the plot. By giving the optional argument `-persist` (same as for gnuplot under x11; former Windows-only options `/noend` or `-noend` are still accepted as well), will not close gnuplot. Contrary to gnuplot on other operating systems, gnuplot's interactive command line is accessible after the -persist option.

-- GRAPH-MENU --

The `gnuplot graph` window has the following options on a pop-up menu accessed by pressing the right mouse button or selecting `Options` from the system menu:

`Bring to Top` when checked brings the graph window to the top after every plot.

`Color` when checked enables color linestyles. When unchecked it forces monochrome linestyles.

`Copy to Clipboard` copies a bitmap and a Metafile picture.

`Background...` sets the window background color.

`Choose Font...` selects the font used in the graphics window.

`Line Styles...` allows customization of the line colors and styles.

`Print...` prints the graphics windows using a Windows printer driver and allows selection of the printer and scaling of the output. The output produced by `Print` is not as good as that from `gnuplot`'s own printer drivers.

`Update wgnuplot.ini` saves the current window locations, window sizes, text window font, text window font size, graph window font, graph window font size, background color and linestyles to the initialization file `WGNUPLOT.INI`.

-- PRINTING --

In order of preference, graphs may be be printed in the following ways.

`1.` Use the `gnuplot` command `set terminal` to select a printer and output to redirect output to a file.

`2.` Select the `Print...` command from the `gnuplot graph` window. An extra command `screendump` does this from the text window.

`3.` If `set output "PRN"` is used, output will go to a temporary file. When you exit from `gnuplot` or when you change the output with another output command, a dialog box will appear for you to select a printer port. If you choose OK, the output will be printed on the selected port, passing unmodified through the print manager. It is possible to accidentally (or deliberately) send printer output meant for one printer to an incompatible printer.

-- TEXT-MENU --

The `gnuplot text` window has the following options on a pop-up menu accessed by pressing the right mouse button or selecting `Options` from the system menu:

`Copy to Clipboard` copies marked text to the clipboard.

`Paste` copies text from the clipboard as if typed by the user.

`Choose Font...` selects the font used in the text window.

`System Colors` when selected makes the text window honor the System Colors set using the Control Panel. When unselected, text is black or blue on a white background.

`Update wgnuplot.ini` saves the current text window location, text window size, text window font and text window font size to the initialisation file `WGNUPLOT.INI`.

`MENU BAR`

If the menu file `WGNUPLOT.MNU` is found in the same directory as WGNUPLOT.EXE, then the menu specified in `WGNUPLOT.MNU` will be loaded. Menu commands:

[Menu] starts a new menu with the name on the following line.

[EndMenu] ends the current menu.

[-] inserts a horizontal menu separator.

[|] inserts a vertical menu separator.

[Button] puts the next macro on a push button instead of a menu.

Macros take two lines with the macro name (menu entry) on the first line and the macro on the second line. Leading spaces are ignored. Macro commands:

[INPUT] -- Input string with prompt terminated by [EOS] or {ENTER}

[EOS] -- End Of String terminator. Generates no output.

[OPEN] -- Get name of file to open from list box, with title of list box terminated by [EOS], followed by default filename terminated by [EOS] or {ENTER}. This uses COMMDLG.DLL from Windows 3.1.

[SAVE] -- Get name of file to save. Similar to [OPEN]

Macro character substitutions:

{ENTER} -- Carriage Return '\\r'

{TAB} -- Tab '\\011'

{ESC} -- Escape '\\033'

{^A} -- '\\001'

...

{^_} -- '\\031'

Macros are limited to 256 characters after expansion.

-- WGNUPLOT.INI --

Windows `gnuplot` will read some of its options from the `[WGNUPLOT]` section of `WGNUPLOT.INI` in user's %APPDATA% directory. A sample `WGNUPLOT.INI` file:

 
      [WGNUPLOT]
      TextOrigin=0 0
      TextSize=640 150
      TextFont=Terminal,9
      GraphOrigin=0 150
      GraphSize=640 330
      GraphFont=Arial,10
      GraphColor=1
      GraphToTop=1
      GraphBackground=255 255 255
      Border=0 0 0 0 0
      Axis=192 192 192 2 2
      Line1=0 0 255 0 0
      Line2=0 255 0 0 1
      Line3=255 0 0 0 2
      Line4=255 0 255 0 3
      Line5=0 0 128 0 4

The `GraphFont` entry specifies the font name and size in points. The five numbers given in the `Border`, `Axis` and `Line` entries are the `Red` intensity (0-255), `Green` intensity, `Blue` intensity, `Color Linestyle` and `Mono Linestyle`. `Linestyles` are 0=SOLID, 1=DASH, 2=DOT, 3=DASHDOT, 4=DASHDOTDOT. In the sample `WGNUPLOT.INI` file above, Line 2 is a green solid line in color mode, or a dashed line in monochrome mode. The default line width is 1 pixel. If `Linestyle` is negative, it specifies the width of a SOLID line in pixels. Line1 and any linestyle used with the `points` style must be SOLID with unit width.

-- WINDOWS3.0 --

Windows 3.1 is preferred, but WGNUPLOT will run under Windows 3.0 with the following restrictions: `1.` COMMDLG.DLL and SHELL.DLL (available with Windows 3.1 or Borland C++ 3.1) must be in the windows directory.

`2.` WGNUPLOT.HLP produced by Borland C++ 3.1 is in Windows 3.1 format. You need to use the WINHELP.EXE supplied with Borland C++ 3.1.

`3.` It will not run in real mode due to lack of memory.

`4.` TrueType fonts are not available in the graph window.

`5.` Drag-drop does not work."


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3.1.0.75 x11

`gnuplot` provides the `x11` terminal type for use with X servers. This terminal type is set automatically at startup if the `DISPLAY` environment variable is set, if the `TERM` environment variable is set to `xterm`, or if the `-display` command line option is used.

Syntax:

 
   set terminal x11 {<n>}
                    {title "<string>"}
                    {{no}enhanced}
                    {font <fontspec>}
                    {{no}persist} {{no}raise} {solid|dashed} {{no}ctrlq}
                    {close}
   set terminal x11 {reset}

Multiple plot windows are supported: `set terminal x11 <n>` directs the output to plot window number n. If n is not 0, the terminal number will be appended to the window title (unless a title has been supplied manually) and the icon will be labeled `Gnuplot <n>`. The active window may be distinguished by a change in cursor (from default to crosshair).

The x11 terminal support enhanced text mode (see `enhanced`), subject to the available fonts. In order for font size commands embedded in text to have any effect, the default x11 font must be scalable. Thus the first example below will work as expected, but the second will not.

 
   set term x11 enhanced font "arial,15" 
   set title '{/=20 Big} Medium {/=5 Small}' 

 
   set term x11 enhanced font "terminal-14" 
   set title '{/=20 Big} Medium {/=5 Small}' 

Plot windows remain open even when the `gnuplot` driver is changed to a different device. A plot window can be closed by pressing the letter q while that window has input focus, or by choosing `close` from a window manager menu. All plot windows can be closed by specifying reset, which actually terminates the subprocess which maintains the windows (unless `-persist` was specified). The `close` command can be used to close individual plot windows by number. However, after a reset, those plot windows left due to persist cannot be closed with the command `close`. A `close` without a number closes the current active plot window.

The gnuplot outboard driver, gnuplot_x11, is searched in a default place chosen when the program is compiled. You can override that by defining the environment variable GNUPLOT_DRIVER_DIR to point to a different location.

Plot windows will automatically be closed at the end of the session unless the `-persist` option was given.

The options `persist` and raise are unset by default, which means that the defaults (persist == no and raise == yes) or the command line options -persist / -raise or the Xresources are taken. If [no]persist or [no]raise are specified, they will override command line options and Xresources. Setting one of these options takes place immediately, so the behaviour of an already running driver can be modified. If the window does not get raised, see discussion in raise.

The option `title "<title name>"` will supply the title name of the window for the current plot window or plot window <n> if a number is given. Where (or if) this title is shown depends on your X window manager.

The size or aspect ratio of a plot may be changed by resizing the `gnuplot` window.

Linewidths and pointsizes may be changed from within `gnuplot` with `set linestyle`.

For terminal type `x11`, `gnuplot` accepts (when initialized) the standard X Toolkit options and resources such as geometry, font, and name from the command line arguments or a configuration file. See the X(1) man page (or its equivalent) for a description of such options.

A number of other `gnuplot` options are available for the `x11` terminal. These may be specified either as command-line options when `gnuplot` is invoked or as resources in the configuration file ".Xdefaults". They are set upon initialization and cannot be altered during a `gnuplot` session. (except `persist` and raise)

-- X11_FONTS --

Upon initial startup, the default font is taken from the X11 resources as set in the system or user .Xdefaults file or on the command line.

Example:

 
      gnuplot*font: lucidasans-bold-12

A new default font may be specified to the x11 driver from inside gnuplot using

 
     `set term x11 font "<fontspec>"`

The driver first queries the X-server for a font of the exact name given. If this query fails, then it tries to interpret <fontspec> as "<font>,<size>,<slant>,<weight>" and to construct a full X11 font name of the form

 
      -*-<font>-<weight>-<s>-*-*-<size>-*-*-*-*-*-<encoding>

 
 <font> is the base name of the font (e.g. Times or Symbol)
 <size> is the point size (defaults to 12 if not specified)
 <s> is `i` if <slant>=="italic" `o` if <slant>=="oblique" `r` otherwise
 <weight> is `medium` or `bold` if explicitly requested, otherwise `*`
 <encoding> is set based on the current character set (see encoding).

So `set term x11 font "arial,15,italic"` will be translated to -*-arial-*-i-*-*-15-*-*-*-*-*-iso8859-1 (assuming default encoding). The <size>, <slant>, and <weight> specifications are all optional. If you do not specify <slant> or <weight> then you will get whatever font variant the font server offers first. You may set a default enconding via the corresponding X11 resource. E.g.

 
      gnuplot*encoding: iso8859-15

The driver also recognizes some common PostScript font names and replaces them with possible X11 or TrueType equivalents. This same sequence is used to process font requests from label.

If your gnuplot was built with configuration option -enable-x11-mbfonts, you can specify multi-byte fonts by using the prefix "mbfont:" on the font name. An additional font may be given, separated by a semicolon. Since multi-byte font encodings are interpreted according to the locale setting, you must make sure that the environmental variable LC_CTYPE is set to some appropriate locale value such as ja_JP.eucJP, ko_KR.EUC, or zh_CN.EUC.

Example:

 
      set term x11 font 'mbfont:kana14;k14'
            # 'kana14' and 'k14' are Japanese X11 font aliases, and ';'
            # is the separator of font names.
      set term x11 font 'mbfont:fixed,16,r,medium'
            # <font>,<size>,<slant>,<weight> form is also usable.
      set title '(mb strings)' font 'mbfont:*-fixed-medium-r-normal--14-*'

The same syntax applies to the default font in Xresources settings, for example,

 
      gnuplot*font: \\
          mbfont:-misc-fixed-medium-r-normal--14-*-*-*-c-*-jisx0208.1983-0

If gnuplot is built with -enable-x11-mbfonts, you can use two special PostScript font names 'Ryumin-Light-*' and 'GothicBBB-Medium-*' (standard Japanese PS fonts) without the prefix "mbfont:".

-- COMMAND-LINE_OPTIONS --

In addition to the X Toolkit options, the following options may be specified on the command line when starting `gnuplot` or as resources in your ".Xdefaults" file (note that raise and `persist` can be overridden later by `set term x11 [no]raise [no]persist)`:

 
 `-mono`     forces monochrome rendering on color displays.
 `-gray`     requests grayscale rendering on grayscale or color displays.
             (Grayscale displays receive monochrome rendering by default.)
 `-clear`    requests that the window be cleared momentarily before a
             new plot is displayed.
 `-tvtwm`    requests that geometry specifications for position of the
             window be made relative to the currently displayed portion
             of the virtual root.
 `-raise`    raises plot window after each plot
 `-noraise`  does not raise plot window after each plot
 `-noevents` does not process mouse and key events
 `-ctrlq   ` closes window on ctrl-q rather than q
 `-persist`  plot windows survive after main gnuplot program exits

The options are shown above in their command-line syntax. When entered as resources in ".Xdefaults", they require a different syntax.

Example:

 
      gnuplot*gray:  on
      gnuplot*ctrlq: on

`gnuplot` also provides a command line option (`-pointsize <v>`) and a resource, `gnuplot*pointsize: <v>`, to control the size of points plotted with the `points` plotting style. The value `v` is a real number (greater than 0 and less than or equal to ten) used as a scaling factor for point sizes. For example, `-pointsize 2` uses points twice the default size, and `-pointsize 0.5` uses points half the normal size.

The `-noevents` switch disables all mouse and key event processing (except for `q` and `<space>` for closing the window). This is useful for programs which use the x11 driver independent of the gnuplot main program.

The `-ctrlq` switch changes the hot-key that closes a plot window from `q` to `<ctrl>q`. This is useful is you are using the keystroke-capture feature `pause mouse keystroke`, since it allows the character `q` to be captured just as all other alphanumeric characters. The `-ctrlq` switch similarly replaces the <space> hot-key with <ctrl><space> for the same reason.

-- MONOCHROME_OPTIONS --

For monochrome displays, `gnuplot` does not honor foreground or background colors. The default is black-on-white. `-rv` or `gnuplot*reverseVideo: on` requests white-on-black.

-- COLOR_RESOURCES --

For color displays, `gnuplot` honors the following resources (shown here with their default values) or the greyscale resources. The values may be color names as listed in the X11 rgb.txt file on your system, hexadecimal RGB color specifications (see X11 documentation), or a color name followed by a comma and an `intensity` value from 0 to 1. For example, `blue, 0.5` means a half intensity blue.

 
 gnuplot*background:  white
 gnuplot*textColor:   black
 gnuplot*borderColor: black
 gnuplot*axisColor:   black
 gnuplot*line1Color:  red
 gnuplot*line2Color:  green
 gnuplot*line3Color:  blue
 gnuplot*line4Color:  magenta
 gnuplot*line5Color:  cyan
 gnuplot*line6Color:  sienna
 gnuplot*line7Color:  orange
 gnuplot*line8Color:  coral

The command-line syntax for these is simple only for background, which maps directly to the usual X11 toolkit option "-bg". All others can only be set on the command line by use of the generic "-xrm" resource override option

Examples:

 
      gnuplot -background coral

to change the background color.

 
      gnuplot -xrm 'gnuplot*line1Color:blue'

to override the first linetype color.

-- GRAYSCALE_RESOURCES --

When `-gray` is selected, `gnuplot` honors the following resources for grayscale or color displays (shown here with their default values). Note that the default background is black.

 
 gnuplot*background: black
 gnuplot*textGray:   white
 gnuplot*borderGray: gray50
 gnuplot*axisGray:   gray50
 gnuplot*line1Gray:  gray100
 gnuplot*line2Gray:  gray60
 gnuplot*line3Gray:  gray80
 gnuplot*line4Gray:  gray40
 gnuplot*line5Gray:  gray90
 gnuplot*line6Gray:  gray50
 gnuplot*line7Gray:  gray70
 gnuplot*line8Gray:  gray30

-- LINE_RESOURCES --

`gnuplot` honors the following resources for setting the width (in pixels) of plot lines (shown here with their default values.) 0 or 1 means a minimal width line of 1 pixel width. A value of 2 or 3 may improve the appearance of some plots.

 
 gnuplot*borderWidth: 2
 gnuplot*axisWidth:   0
 gnuplot*line1Width:  0
 gnuplot*line2Width:  0
 gnuplot*line3Width:  0
 gnuplot*line4Width:  0
 gnuplot*line5Width:  0
 gnuplot*line6Width:  0
 gnuplot*line7Width:  0
 gnuplot*line8Width:  0

`gnuplot` honors the following resources for setting the dash style used for plotting lines. 0 means a solid line. A two-digit number `jk` (`j` and `k` are >= 1 and <= 9) means a dashed line with a repeated pattern of `j` pixels on followed by `k` pixels off. For example, '16' is a dotted line with one pixel on followed by six pixels off. More elaborate on/off patterns can be specified with a four-digit value. For example, '4441' is four on, four off, four on, one off. The default values shown below are for monochrome displays or monochrome rendering on color or grayscale displays. Color displays default to dashed:off

 
 gnuplot*dashed:       off
 gnuplot*borderDashes:   0
 gnuplot*axisDashes:    16
 gnuplot*line1Dashes:    0
 gnuplot*line2Dashes:   42
 gnuplot*line3Dashes:   13
 gnuplot*line4Dashes:   44
 gnuplot*line5Dashes:   15
 gnuplot*line6Dashes: 4441
 gnuplot*line7Dashes:   42
 gnuplot*line8Dashes:   13

, "

-- X11 PM3D_RESOURCES --

Choosing the appropriate visual class and number of colors is a crucial point in X11 applications and a bit awkward, since X11 supports six visual types in different depths.

By default `gnuplot` uses the default visual of the screen. The number of colors which can be allocated depends on the visual class chosen. On a visual class with a depth > 12bit, gnuplot starts with a maximal number of 0x200 colors. On a visual class with a depth > 8bit (but <= 12 bit) the maximal number of colors is 0x100, on <= 8bit displays the maximum number of colors is 240 (16 are left for line colors).

Gnuplot first starts to allocate the maximal number of colors as stated above. If this fails, the number of colors is reduced by the factor 2 until gnuplot gets all colors which are requested. If dividing `maxcolors` by 2 repeatedly results in a number which is smaller than `mincolors` `gnuplot` tries to install a private colormap. In this case the window manager is responsible for swapping colormaps when the pointer is moved in and out the x11 driver's window.

The default for `mincolors` is maxcolors / (num_colormaps > 1 ? 2 : 8), where num_colormaps is the number of colormaps which are currently used by gnuplot (usually 1, if only one x11 window is open).

Some systems support multiple (different) visual classes together on one screen. On these systems it might be necessary to force gnuplot to use a specific visual class, e.g. the default visual might be 8bit PseudoColor but the screen would also support 24bit TrueColor which would be the preferred choice.

The information about an Xserver's capabilities can be obtained with the program `xdpyinfo`. For the visual names below you can choose one of StaticGray, GrayScale, StaticColor, PseudoColor, TrueColor, DirectColor. If an Xserver supports a requested visual type at different depths, `gnuplot` chooses the visual class with the highest depth (deepest). If the requested visual class matches the default visual and multiple classes of this type are supported, the default visual is preferred.

Example: on an 8bit PseudoColor visual you can force a private color map by specifying `gnuplot*maxcolors: 240` and `gnuplot*mincolors: 240`.

 
 gnuplot*maxcolors:  <integer>
 gnuplot*mincolors:  <integer>
 gnuplot*visual:     <visual name>

, "

-- X11 OTHER_RESOURCES --

By default the contents of the current plot window are exported to the X11 clipboard in response to X events in the window. Setting the resource 'gnuplot*exportselection' to 'off' or 'false' will disable this.

By default text rotation is done using a method that is fast, but can corrupt nearby colors depending on the background. If this is a problem, you can set the resource 'gnuplot.fastrotate' to 'off'

 
 gnuplot*exportselection:  off
 gnuplot*fastrotate:  on
 gnuplot*ctrlq:  off


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3.1.0.76 x11

`gnuplot` provides the `x11` terminal type for use with X servers. This terminal type is set automatically at startup if the `DISPLAY` environment variable is set, if the `TERM` environment variable is set to `xterm`, or if the `-display` command line option is used.

Syntax:

 
   set terminal x11 {<n>}
                    {title "<string>"}
                    {{no}enhanced}
                    {font <fontspec>}
                    {{no}persist} {{no}raise} {solid|dashed} {{no}ctrlq}
                    {close}
   set terminal x11 {reset}

Multiple plot windows are supported: `set terminal x11 <n>` directs the output to plot window number n. If n is not 0, the terminal number will be appended to the window title (unless a title has been supplied manually) and the icon will be labeled `Gnuplot <n>`. The active window may be distinguished by a change in cursor (from default to crosshair).

The x11 terminal support enhanced text mode (see `enhanced`), subject to the available fonts. In order for font size commands embedded in text to have any effect, the default x11 font must be scalable. Thus the first example below will work as expected, but the second will not.

 
   set term x11 enhanced font "arial,15" 
   set title '{/=20 Big} Medium {/=5 Small}' 

 
   set term x11 enhanced font "terminal-14" 
   set title '{/=20 Big} Medium {/=5 Small}' 

Plot windows remain open even when the `gnuplot` driver is changed to a different device. A plot window can be closed by pressing the letter q while that window has input focus, or by choosing `close` from a window manager menu. All plot windows can be closed by specifying reset, which actually terminates the subprocess which maintains the windows (unless `-persist` was specified). The `close` command can be used to close individual plot windows by number. However, after a reset, those plot windows left due to persist cannot be closed with the command `close`. A `close` without a number closes the current active plot window.

The gnuplot outboard driver, gnuplot_x11, is searched in a default place chosen when the program is compiled. You can override that by defining the environment variable GNUPLOT_DRIVER_DIR to point to a different location.

Plot windows will automatically be closed at the end of the session unless the `-persist` option was given.

The options `persist` and raise are unset by default, which means that the defaults (persist == no and raise == yes) or the command line options -persist / -raise or the Xresources are taken. If [no]persist or [no]raise are specified, they will override command line options and Xresources. Setting one of these options takes place immediately, so the behaviour of an already running driver can be modified. If the window does not get raised, see discussion in raise.

The option `title "<title name>"` will supply the title name of the window for the current plot window or plot window <n> if a number is given. Where (or if) this title is shown depends on your X window manager.

The size or aspect ratio of a plot may be changed by resizing the `gnuplot` window.

Linewidths and pointsizes may be changed from within `gnuplot` with `set linestyle`.

For terminal type `x11`, `gnuplot` accepts (when initialized) the standard X Toolkit options and resources such as geometry, font, and name from the command line arguments or a configuration file. See the X(1) man page (or its equivalent) for a description of such options.

A number of other `gnuplot` options are available for the `x11` terminal. These may be specified either as command-line options when `gnuplot` is invoked or as resources in the configuration file ".Xdefaults". They are set upon initialization and cannot be altered during a `gnuplot` session. (except `persist` and raise)

-- X11_FONTS --

Upon initial startup, the default font is taken from the X11 resources as set in the system or user .Xdefaults file or on the command line.

Example:

 
      gnuplot*font: lucidasans-bold-12

A new default font may be specified to the x11 driver from inside gnuplot using

 
     `set term x11 font "<fontspec>"`

The driver first queries the X-server for a font of the exact name given. If this query fails, then it tries to interpret <fontspec> as "<font>,<size>,<slant>,<weight>" and to construct a full X11 font name of the form

 
      -*-<font>-<weight>-<s>-*-*-<size>-*-*-*-*-*-<encoding>

 
 <font> is the base name of the font (e.g. Times or Symbol)
 <size> is the point size (defaults to 12 if not specified)
 <s> is `i` if <slant>=="italic" `o` if <slant>=="oblique" `r` otherwise
 <weight> is `medium` or `bold` if explicitly requested, otherwise `*`
 <encoding> is set based on the current character set (see encoding).

So `set term x11 font "arial,15,italic"` will be translated to -*-arial-*-i-*-*-15-*-*-*-*-*-iso8859-1 (assuming default encoding). The <size>, <slant>, and <weight> specifications are all optional. If you do not specify <slant> or <weight> then you will get whatever font variant the font server offers first. You may set a default enconding via the corresponding X11 resource. E.g.

 
      gnuplot*encoding: iso8859-15

The driver also recognizes some common PostScript font names and replaces them with possible X11 or TrueType equivalents. This same sequence is used to process font requests from label.

If your gnuplot was built with configuration option -enable-x11-mbfonts, you can specify multi-byte fonts by using the prefix "mbfont:" on the font name. An additional font may be given, separated by a semicolon. Since multi-byte font encodings are interpreted according to the locale setting, you must make sure that the environmental variable LC_CTYPE is set to some appropriate locale value such as ja_JP.eucJP, ko_KR.EUC, or zh_CN.EUC.

Example:

 
      set term x11 font 'mbfont:kana14;k14'
            # 'kana14' and 'k14' are Japanese X11 font aliases, and ';'
            # is the separator of font names.
      set term x11 font 'mbfont:fixed,16,r,medium'
            # <font>,<size>,<slant>,<weight> form is also usable.
      set title '(mb strings)' font 'mbfont:*-fixed-medium-r-normal--14-*'

The same syntax applies to the default font in Xresources settings, for example,

 
      gnuplot*font: \\
          mbfont:-misc-fixed-medium-r-normal--14-*-*-*-c-*-jisx0208.1983-0

If gnuplot is built with -enable-x11-mbfonts, you can use two special PostScript font names 'Ryumin-Light-*' and 'GothicBBB-Medium-*' (standard Japanese PS fonts) without the prefix "mbfont:".

-- COMMAND-LINE_OPTIONS --

In addition to the X Toolkit options, the following options may be specified on the command line when starting `gnuplot` or as resources in your ".Xdefaults" file (note that raise and `persist` can be overridden later by `set term x11 [no]raise [no]persist)`:

 
 `-mono`     forces monochrome rendering on color displays.
 `-gray`     requests grayscale rendering on grayscale or color displays.
             (Grayscale displays receive monochrome rendering by default.)
 `-clear`    requests that the window be cleared momentarily before a
             new plot is displayed.
 `-tvtwm`    requests that geometry specifications for position of the
             window be made relative to the currently displayed portion
             of the virtual root.
 `-raise`    raises plot window after each plot
 `-noraise`  does not raise plot window after each plot
 `-noevents` does not process mouse and key events
 `-ctrlq   ` closes window on ctrl-q rather than q
 `-persist`  plot windows survive after main gnuplot program exits

The options are shown above in their command-line syntax. When entered as resources in ".Xdefaults", they require a different syntax.

Example:

 
      gnuplot*gray:  on
      gnuplot*ctrlq: on

`gnuplot` also provides a command line option (`-pointsize <v>`) and a resource, `gnuplot*pointsize: <v>`, to control the size of points plotted with the `points` plotting style. The value `v` is a real number (greater than 0 and less than or equal to ten) used as a scaling factor for point sizes. For example, `-pointsize 2` uses points twice the default size, and `-pointsize 0.5` uses points half the normal size.

The `-noevents` switch disables all mouse and key event processing (except for `q` and `<space>` for closing the window). This is useful for programs which use the x11 driver independent of the gnuplot main program.

The `-ctrlq` switch changes the hot-key that closes a plot window from `q` to `<ctrl>q`. This is useful is you are using the keystroke-capture feature `pause mouse keystroke`, since it allows the character `q` to be captured just as all other alphanumeric characters. The `-ctrlq` switch similarly replaces the <space> hot-key with <ctrl><space> for the same reason.

-- MONOCHROME_OPTIONS --

For monochrome displays, `gnuplot` does not honor foreground or background colors. The default is black-on-white. `-rv` or `gnuplot*reverseVideo: on` requests white-on-black.

-- COLOR_RESOURCES --

For color displays, `gnuplot` honors the following resources (shown here with their default values) or the greyscale resources. The values may be color names as listed in the X11 rgb.txt file on your system, hexadecimal RGB color specifications (see X11 documentation), or a color name followed by a comma and an `intensity` value from 0 to 1. For example, `blue, 0.5` means a half intensity blue.

 
 gnuplot*background:  white
 gnuplot*textColor:   black
 gnuplot*borderColor: black
 gnuplot*axisColor:   black
 gnuplot*line1Color:  red
 gnuplot*line2Color:  green
 gnuplot*line3Color:  blue
 gnuplot*line4Color:  magenta
 gnuplot*line5Color:  cyan
 gnuplot*line6Color:  sienna
 gnuplot*line7Color:  orange
 gnuplot*line8Color:  coral

The command-line syntax for these is simple only for background, which maps directly to the usual X11 toolkit option "-bg". All others can only be set on the command line by use of the generic "-xrm" resource override option

Examples:

 
      gnuplot -background coral

to change the background color.

 
      gnuplot -xrm 'gnuplot*line1Color:blue'

to override the first linetype color.

-- GRAYSCALE_RESOURCES --

When `-gray` is selected, `gnuplot` honors the following resources for grayscale or color displays (shown here with their default values). Note that the default background is black.

 
 gnuplot*background: black
 gnuplot*textGray:   white
 gnuplot*borderGray: gray50
 gnuplot*axisGray:   gray50
 gnuplot*line1Gray:  gray100
 gnuplot*line2Gray:  gray60
 gnuplot*line3Gray:  gray80
 gnuplot*line4Gray:  gray40
 gnuplot*line5Gray:  gray90
 gnuplot*line6Gray:  gray50
 gnuplot*line7Gray:  gray70
 gnuplot*line8Gray:  gray30

-- LINE_RESOURCES --

`gnuplot` honors the following resources for setting the width (in pixels) of plot lines (shown here with their default values.) 0 or 1 means a minimal width line of 1 pixel width. A value of 2 or 3 may improve the appearance of some plots.

 
 gnuplot*borderWidth: 2
 gnuplot*axisWidth:   0
 gnuplot*line1Width:  0
 gnuplot*line2Width:  0
 gnuplot*line3Width:  0
 gnuplot*line4Width:  0
 gnuplot*line5Width:  0
 gnuplot*line6Width:  0
 gnuplot*line7Width:  0
 gnuplot*line8Width:  0

`gnuplot` honors the following resources for setting the dash style used for plotting lines. 0 means a solid line. A two-digit number `jk` (`j` and `k` are >= 1 and <= 9) means a dashed line with a repeated pattern of `j` pixels on followed by `k` pixels off. For example, '16' is a dotted line with one pixel on followed by six pixels off. More elaborate on/off patterns can be specified with a four-digit value. For example, '4441' is four on, four off, four on, one off. The default values shown below are for monochrome displays or monochrome rendering on color or grayscale displays. Color displays default to dashed:off

 
 gnuplot*dashed:       off
 gnuplot*borderDashes:   0
 gnuplot*axisDashes:    16
 gnuplot*line1Dashes:    0
 gnuplot*line2Dashes:   42
 gnuplot*line3Dashes:   13
 gnuplot*line4Dashes:   44
 gnuplot*line5Dashes:   15
 gnuplot*line6Dashes: 4441
 gnuplot*line7Dashes:   42
 gnuplot*line8Dashes:   13

, "

-- X11 PM3D_RESOURCES --

Choosing the appropriate visual class and number of colors is a crucial point in X11 applications and a bit awkward, since X11 supports six visual types in different depths.

By default `gnuplot` uses the default visual of the screen. The number of colors which can be allocated depends on the visual class chosen. On a visual class with a depth > 12bit, gnuplot starts with a maximal number of 0x200 colors. On a visual class with a depth > 8bit (but <= 12 bit) the maximal number of colors is 0x100, on <= 8bit displays the maximum number of colors is 240 (16 are left for line colors).

Gnuplot first starts to allocate the maximal number of colors as stated above. If this fails, the number of colors is reduced by the factor 2 until gnuplot gets all colors which are requested. If dividing `maxcolors` by 2 repeatedly results in a number which is smaller than `mincolors` `gnuplot` tries to install a private colormap. In this case the window manager is responsible for swapping colormaps when the pointer is moved in and out the x11 driver's window.

The default for `mincolors` is maxcolors / (num_colormaps > 1 ? 2 : 8), where num_colormaps is the number of colormaps which are currently used by gnuplot (usually 1, if only one x11 window is open).

Some systems support multiple (different) visual classes together on one screen. On these systems it might be necessary to force gnuplot to use a specific visual class, e.g. the default visual might be 8bit PseudoColor but the screen would also support 24bit TrueColor which would be the preferred choice.

The information about an Xserver's capabilities can be obtained with the program `xdpyinfo`. For the visual names below you can choose one of StaticGray, GrayScale, StaticColor, PseudoColor, TrueColor, DirectColor. If an Xserver supports a requested visual type at different depths, `gnuplot` chooses the visual class with the highest depth (deepest). If the requested visual class matches the default visual and multiple classes of this type are supported, the default visual is preferred.

Example: on an 8bit PseudoColor visual you can force a private color map by specifying `gnuplot*maxcolors: 240` and `gnuplot*mincolors: 240`.

 
 gnuplot*maxcolors:  <integer>
 gnuplot*mincolors:  <integer>
 gnuplot*visual:     <visual name>

, "

-- X11 OTHER_RESOURCES --

By default the contents of the current plot window are exported to the X11 clipboard in response to X events in the window. Setting the resource 'gnuplot*exportselection' to 'off' or 'false' will disable this.

By default text rotation is done using a method that is fast, but can corrupt nearby colors depending on the background. If this is a problem, you can set the resource 'gnuplot.fastrotate' to 'off'

 
 gnuplot*exportselection:  off
 gnuplot*fastrotate:  on
 gnuplot*ctrlq:  off


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3.1.0.77 xlib

The `xlib` terminal driver supports the X11 Windows System. It generates gnuplot_x11 commands, but sends them to the output file specified by `set output '<filename>'`. `set term x11` is equivalent to `set terminal xlib; set output "|gnuplot_x11 -noevents"`. `xlib` takes the same set of options as `x11`."


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3.1.0.78 xlib

The `xlib` terminal driver supports the X11 Windows System. It generates gnuplot_x11 commands, but sends them to the output file specified by `set output '<filename>'`. `set term x11` is equivalent to `set terminal xlib; set output "|gnuplot_x11 -noevents"`. `xlib` takes the same set of options as `x11`."


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